Series 7 (4 March 1833-3 March 1837)

Displaying 121 - 135 of 466
Young Mr. Crosby is the Grandson of an old Patriot & is himself as far as I can judge from a short acquiantance, a worthy and enterprising lad. If he could consistently be appointed, I should be gratified.
Sender: MVB
Mr Taney & Mr Young <illegible> understand this case, & will cheerfully give you all the information you may require. It is <illegible> ^one^ deserving attention, & I sincerely hope you may have it in your power to do justice to Mr <illegible> (who is a worthy man, & faithful public officer,) <on> the <premises>. If the law (as is supposed) deprives... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Levi Woodbury
I regret that the exceedingly that my ^previous^ arrangements in regard to time put it out of my power to accept your kind invitation for the 4th. Instant. There are ^is^ certainly no portion of my Fellow Citizens with whom it would give me more pleasure to unite in the celebration of a day always dear to us & to which the character of the times ^condition of the Country at the present moment... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
As the enclosed may possibly miss you on your travels I think it safest to <enclose> ^send^ it to you. I hope you will think well of the views which it takes of the subject. They have given great satisfaction in this quarter & cannot fail of effect. The ground that this is in truth a question between Aristocracy and Democracy, cannot be too often or too forcibly impressed upon the minds... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Andrew Jackson
To the honorable, the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States. The undersigned, members of Congress respectfully request, that the practise of sending or dealing out, ardent spirits, in the Capitol may be abolished, & that the introduction of it, into any of the rooms or other place or places in or about the capitol, may be prohibited... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I propose to leave here by the 10th of July at the farthest, & possibly a little before. Unless therefore you see (the resolution for adjournment rescinded,) an event not probable you must be here in season to accompany me. I say you must because I have made my calculations upon it & cannot now be disappointed. Affairs are extremely well here in all matters except the Post office &... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: John Van Buren
I have <discussed> with Mr Forsyth & find all right. I will see you on my return from the Capitol.
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Andrew Jackson
I have kept the accompanying letter by me for some time undecided how to proceed in order to obtain of government the favor Mr. Huger urges me so imperatively to solicit for him. Huger deserves well of the administration and has claims upon the democratic party. They are I believe known to you and if you can make them available to obtain a midshipman’s warrant for his nephew Thomas Huger you will... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I stopped on my way up & spent part of ^the next^ Sunday & Monday after I left you, with the Surrogate. He promised to send you the money of which you spoke to me & which I never have had. He has probably attended to the matter before this. If you head up in this month, I shall hardly be able to come down to Washn. so soon as the 30th. My arm still continues very sore, but I trust,... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
A public dinner will be given on the 4th of July next, at this place, by the Democratic Republican Citizens of Fredericksburg, Falmouth, and their Vicinities; and the undersigned have been appointed a Committee of Correspondence to invite such Members of Congress, and other distinguished persons agreeing with them in sentiment, as we might deem expedient:—In executing this duty, we take pleasure... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I am told there is a rumour in Town that you were informed by the King when the Treaty was signed that it would not be carried into effect by the chamber. Although I am well satisfied that there is no truth in this story, I think you had better authorize me to contradict it, if that should become necessary, & if the truth will justify it.
Sender: MVB
Our quondam friend Genl. Hayne used to say that I was a labor-saving machine, & I am forcibly reminded of the remark by this attempt to Kill two birds with one stone, or rather, as I hope, to feed two pretty ones off of one cherry. Any how you will I know excuse me. Don't forget my suggestion about the French affair. Assume confidentially the strongest personal assurances from the King with... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I would have answered your first letter immediately but for a dasire to consult Mr. Croswell, who was expected here & has since arrived. The result has satisfied me that neither of the persons spoken of would answer the purpose. You must have a NewYork man well acquainted with Nyork politics. It would perhaps be preferable that the person should be designated by others than myself. There is... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I am to day for the first time in a long while somewhat unwell, and must therefore content myself with a short letter. The enclosed will speak for itself. The untoward events in France, and great disappointment in not getting off, have somewhat disturbed the good Ladies usual serenity, but in every thing that relates to you & yours, all is I am persuaded, as it should be. Our dissipations... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The Crisis We this day lay before our readers a document of deeper interest, one which in ^from^ its character ^nature^ & cons probable consequences is more eminently calculated to test ^probe test^ the character of the american people and to test ^probe^ the fo very foundation upon which our hitherto successful ^their political^ institutions are based than any state paper which ^which has... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB

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