Series 7 (4 March 1833-3 March 1837)

Displaying 106 - 120 of 466
I beg you to accept my thanks for the copy of your excellent and interesting letter. It cannot, I should suppose, fail to have a good effect, & am
Sender: MVB
Your letter came only in season to relieve me from the apprehension that I was worse off ^<illegible>^ than to have been forgotten by Mrs Rives & yourself. There are so many ways in which I without knowing it, give offence to public men, that I find I am getting somewhat suspicious of my friends—a vice I hate above all others. But as we are all right again upon the point—at least shall... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I believe I am in no great danger of again <illegible> politicians <illegible> <illegible> but I am nonetheless induced to trouble you with a line or two, even though it may have some appearance of meddling with politics. The name of Jacocks, is, I presume, familiar to you,—and you are probably aware, that some time since, by formal application to the President, he obtained an... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I make to you Mr President & to the Convention over which you have the honor to preside my <illegible> sincere & grateful acknowledgments ^as well^ for the gratifying compliment which has been paid to me in inviting me to a personal presentation to its members as for the very flattering opinion which you have in their behalf been pleased to express of my public conduct. Combining as... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Although the accounts are not quite ^so^ explicit as we could desire, I think I cannot deceive myself in believing, that the administration has succeeded in your elections; and if so, the re-appointment of one who has been so able, so useful, and so disinterested a supporter of it must, I am sure, follow of course. Believe me, my dear sir, that you could not but have been gratified to have... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The approach of our regular election of a Governor and Lieutenant Governor and the established usages of the Republican Party, have again brought together the delegates of your choice, to discharge the important and responsible duty of selecting and presenting to the public suitable candidates for those high offices. This duty upon ordinary occasions delicate and difficult, has been to the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB, Sender: John Sudam, Sender: Alonzo G. Hammond, Sender: James I. Roosevelt Jr.
From the establishment of despotic power by ^through^ the arbitrary assumption of ^authority by^ any one man or any set of men ^means ^^assumptions^^^ which have proved to so fatal to liberty in other countries^ we have I thank god nothing to fear. To satisfy you of this <illegible> truth it is only necessary to invite your own reflection before what you do know, argument cannot be... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The enclosed should have been sooner returned. I rcd. some days since a letter from Mr <Meigher> informing me that some of my friends wished for an opportunity to pay their respects to me on my way down. I have informed them him that should be at Geneva tomorrow & will stay over Sunday. I shall take lodgings at the Hotel, & will go to Ghent and take a family dinner with you on... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Charles Butler
We had a very pleasant day yesterday in all respects. The party at Mr <Greigs> was large, mixed & agreeable, & the regret at your departure general. My squirrel surfeit has passed off I hope without a cholera attack or any great inconvenience beyond the loss of one nights sleep. In the Argus of yesterday will be found a correspondence between the Treasury & Bank, with some very... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I am gratified to perceive that you take so considerable an interest in the case of young O <Sullivan>. He is one of the <illegible> & worthiest youths I ever knew. Gov Dickerson is a very kind hearted man & will be very ready to all he can possible <to> promote the wishes of your correspondent. It is <illegible> most proper from the <relationship> in which I... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
For very obvious reasons I desire not to be quoted upon the subject of your letter. I see no objection certainly to patronizing the North American as it takes a correct course in politics generally & may be useful. But that support ought not to be placed on the ground of a want of confidence in the Globe. I have not a particle of doubt of the <entire> integrity & sincerity of Mr... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I leave here in the morning, & have deferred writing to you until the last moment. We have seen the accounts of recent movements here and will I believe be able to make a fair estimate of them without any speculation from me, If I had time to make them. The Cabinet will be a united one, in which part there is a great much power & virtue. The men are all respectable in point of talent... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I sincerely wish it were in my power to join the Democratic Citizens of the First Congressional District of Pennsylvania in their proposed celebration of the anniversary of American Independence, but circumstances beyond my controul compel me to decline your kind invitation. I must therefore content myself with a compliance with your request in regard to a sentiment for the occasion. There can be... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have this day drawn on you for a small sum & may have occasion to do so again. As soon as I get to Albany I will put my many matters with you in order.
Sender: MVB
My friend Alderman Brasher has a son a midshipman in the navy whom he wishes to go out in the <Potomac>. I have assured him that if you can with propriety gratify him it will give you pleasure to do. The particular object of this note is to make you acquainted with the Alderman who will pay his respects to you.
Sender: MVB

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