Series 7 (4 March 1833-3 March 1837)

Displaying 46 - 60 of 466
Herewith you will receive a certified copy of the commission of Marmaduke Burrough, appointed consul of the United States for the port of Vera Cruz. You will be pleased to request of the Mexican Government the usual exequatur for him.  The accompanying packet you will deliver to Mr. William S. Parrott, appointed consul of the United States for the city of Mexico, and you will also afford him your... Continue Reading
The President, dissatisfied with the continued delays which have taken place in adjusting the points at issue between the two Governments, directs that you will take an early occasion, after the receipt of this communication, to bring them again before the Mexican Government, and to obtain a prompt and definite answer. You will also state that the United States hold the Federal Government of... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
Herewith you will receive documents detailing a series of outrages upon the personal freedom of Captain William McKeige, late master of the brig Industry, belonging to Mr. Cyrus Sibley, of Mobile, perpetrated at Tabasco, in Mexico, by persons exercising there the authority of a district judge and a commandant; which outrages resulted in the loss of the vessel and her cargo. The captain declares,... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
Herewith enclosed, I transmit a duplicate of my No. 58, together with duplicates of the power authorizing you to negotiate an additional article to the treaty of limits, of my letter to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, and of the office copy of the same for yourself. Whenever the subjects of your communications require the use of the cipher, it is deemed advisable that you should put the whole... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
It has occurred to me that, considering how peculiar were the circumstances which gave origin to the claim upon Mexico, in the case of the ship Louisa, and considering also that the claim has not only been acknowledged by the Mexican Government, but in part paid, there is singular hardship, and perhaps injustice, in withlding the residue. You will, therefore, make a renewed application for the... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
I take pleasure in introducing to you our distinguished and most meritorious countryman, Mr. J. J. Audubon, whose splendid work on American ornithology must of course be well known to you. That work, while it reflects such great credit on our country, and contributes so largely to the advancement of one of the most delightful departments of science, is likely, from the extreme expense attendant... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I should be remiss in my duty as a lover of good order and of the honor of the mercantile character in a foreign country, and do injustice to myself, to the country, and to this administration, if I withheld my solemn protest against Daniel N. Pope as United States consul for the port of Tabasco, in Mexico. In presenting my protest and complaints against that United States officer, I will take up... Continue Reading
Recipient: Andrew Jackson
I transmit herewith a memorial to the President, from Mr. Aaron Leggett, of New York, preferring additional charges against Daniel N. Pope, the consul of the United States at Tabasco, which you are instructed to investigate. You will communicate to this Department the result of your investigation of them, and of those against the same person which you were directed to examine by our despatches... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
In pursuance of instructions from the President of the United States, I had the honor, on the 6th of May, 1831, to address a note to his excellency Don Manuel G. Salmon, then his late Majesty's principal Secretary of State, stating that the anxiety which the Government of the United States had long felt, and which had heretofore been fully made known to his Majesty's Government, that an amicable... Continue Reading
It is well known that the United States have at all times been sincerely desirous to see accomplished, on terms mutually honorable and advantageous, the acknowledgment of the independence of the several states of this hemisphere which were formerly the colonies of Spain, and that the President has, on all proper occasions, interposed his good offices towards brining about that happy result. The... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
Your several despatches relative to the seizure, at Vera Cruz, of the New York packet-ship Robert Wilson, have been received. It does not appear to be questioned that spurious coin was introduced by this vessel, although a want of fraudulent intention may be asserted. The act is alleged to be in violation of the laws of Mexico, and the whole transaction is therefore appropriately cognizable by... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
Herewith you will receive a letter from the President to the President of the United Mexican States, together will an office copy of the same. You will at such a time, and in such a way, as you may deem most expedient, ask the Minister of Foreign Affairs to appoint a time for you to deliver the President's communication, and you will apprize this Department of your doings in pursuance of this... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
I transmit, herewith, a copy of a letter from Mr. John Mills, of Missouri, to the Postmaster General; and another, of a letter from the latter gentleman to me, relative to the alleged abduction of Mr. George Abby, a citizen of the United States, by Indians of the Pawnee tribe, roaming within the confines of Mexico. As, by the 33d article of the treaty, provision is made for the occurrence of a... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
It cannot be ascertained from your despatches whether the application you promised in your No. 17, to make to the Mexican Government for a transcript of the judicial proceedings at Tampico, in virtue of which the schooner Rebecca and Eliza, of New York, and her cargo, were, it is alleged, seized and condemned, has been successful or otherwise. Although there is reason to believe that the owners... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
Had it not been for the improvement in our social relations I would not say to you what I am about to say; and I would not even now if I were not quite certain that it will be recd in the proper spirit. You see the attempts which have been made & are making all over the Union to impress the belief that I am involved by the in consequence of the failure of Mr Knower. No sooner is one story put... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB

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