Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)

Displaying 136 - 150 of 298
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 30th ult. I exceedingly regret that such complaints as you state, should exist. If any postmaster can be proven to have suppressed or delayed the due transmission and delivery of newspapers, pamphlets or letters, he shall be instantly dismissed. And I shall be thankful to any gentleman who can detect such gross malfeazance of office. You... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The "unfavourable reports" which you say are pouring in upon you are devices of the enemy & nothing else. It was to prevent the desertions from their ranks which were apprehended that this expedient of lying without rhyme or reason was resorted to. That we may be beaten is certain & if such should be the case I can conscientiously say it is not my fault & will cheerfully submit to... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have just received your communication of the 15th, in which my consent is requested to the publication of my correspondence, in 1814, with the Vice President of the U. States, then governor of New-York, on the subject of his proposed nomination for the department of state. There being nothing in that correspondence which I could possibly wish to be regarded as under a seal of secrecy, I cannot... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
TO THE HONORABLE THE LEGISLATURE. THE Commissioners of the Canal Fund, pursuant to the directions of the act, entitled "an act respecting navigable communications between the Great Western and Northern Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean," passed April 15, 1817—Respectfully Report the following as the state of the Canal Fund. The Annual Revenue consists of Vendue duties, after deducting therefrom the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The friends of the Vice President deem the publication of the correspondence I have refered to important but feel a delicacy about publishing it ^to permit its publication without yo^ without your consent. To meet the event circumstance of your not having the letters in your possession I take the liberty of enclosing copies which have ben taken from the V.P. letter book. I am fully aware Sir of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
The friends of the Vice President deem the publication of the correspondence I have referred to, important, but he feels a delicacy to permit its publication without your consent. To meet the circumstance of your not having the letters in your possession, I take the liberty of enclosing copies which have been taken from the Vice President's letter book. I am fully aware, Sir, of your aversion to... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
Perhaps I was not as explicit on the subject of my last letter as I ought to have been. The Vice President has no doubt of the constitutionality of the restriction, attempted to be imposed on the admission of Missouri nor of the expediency of doing so. His sentiments have always been so & although he could not feel it proper to volunteer his opinion on the subject he would have no hesitation... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I have learnt with great pleasure that you have wisely resolved henceforward to Identify yourself with the Republicans of the State and union. As this act is purely spontaneous and wholly uninfluenced by sinister considerations, It is a step which I am persuaded you will never have occasion to regret. You may for a season be somewhat annoyed by the aspersions of old & the Jealousies of new... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I am delighted with your <Phasion> but I think the publication of them should be delayed for some time & then be published in rapid succession. I wish therefore you would prepare them all & send them to me.
Sender: MVB
Mr Martin V. B. being overwhelmed in business and up to his neck and ears, in politics as the saying is, this afternoon directed me to write to you in his name, and allege as his reason for the substitution, the pressure of his multifarious affairs, and at the same time give you all the news—real, personal & mixed—civil, criminal and political. As I mean to be true to an old rule, stick to... Continue Reading
I am very happy to see that the observer has taken its stand on the old platform, much good must result from it. You must have long since ben satisfyed that the divisions & distractions ^which^ have for a long time existed at Poughkeepsie are unwise & unprofitable, is there no way in which they can be healed, could you not agree to restore fair & friendly political community if even ... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
At a county convention composed of five Republican delegates elected and chosen by and from each of the fifteen Towns in the county of Herkimer and State of Newyork held at the public Inn of Benjamin Kelsey in the village and town of Herkimer on the 30th day of October 1820, of which the Honabl. John Herkimer was chairman and Abijah Mann Junior Secretary It was unanimously Resolved that a due... Continue Reading
A FELLOW Member, who knows, and is personally known to most of you,—who has, from his infancy, taken a deep interest in the honour and prosperity of the party to which you belong, and who, if he has ever erred in his labours to promote its best interest, has erred from defect of judgment, and not from a want of devotion to the cause,—ventures to address you on the subject of the choice of a... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The undersigned inhabitants of the Village of Little Falls & its vicinity in the County of Herkimer Republicans attached from principle to the administration of the general Government, beg leave to represent that it is an opinion we have entertained, that the offices of the general government, should be distributed amongst its friends and we would farther represent in relation to the Post... Continue Reading
The Republican Members of the Legislature, at the close of the last session, announced to you their conviction, that the prosperity of the republican party, and the welfare of the state, required a change of the chief magistrate. Subsequent events have proved the correctness of this opinion, and enforced the expediency of this measure. While a doubt existed that Governor Clinton had abandoned the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB

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