Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)

Displaying 136 - 150 of 245
I have concluded to trouble you once more about my business with my brother William. I am sorry to be under the necessity of doing this, as I know you have as much business of your own as you can attend to, but there is no other person who can assist me so effectually as you can, and you may rely upon it, that if ever an opportunity occurs, I will return the favor. I understand that my brother... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I have waited a few days to answer your letter in the hope that I might be able to say something more than general declarations of friendship and a strong desire to serve you amount to but I have waited in vain, I do not know at this moment of any precise manner in which I we could serve you if you were on the spot. I should however be disappointed if in the course of a short time it is not in... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Your last Draft for $125 was yesterday presented to me & I was under the necessity of giving my note for it payable at the Bank in sixty days which I hope you will not fail to take up. I wish you would without giving yourself any uneasiness enable me to realise the advances made last Winter. I insist upon it now that you suffer the circumstance to give you no pain but only to understand that... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I feel gratefull for your attention to my concerns in regard t[o t]he base attack made on me in the Statesman. The last No. in that paper is so contemptible that my friends think it would unworthy of further notice, but as I cannot know when or in what shape the malice of my enemies may induce them for the want of better materials to revive the ridicul subject I wish you would copy off your... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The above are copies of the Statements I prepared and presented to the Counsel associated with yo in the Cause referred to in them for their Signatures. Mr Jones objected to signing the first because it brought him into conflict with the letter of Mr Varick as to whom he was delicately situated then having been a long and intimate friendship between his father and Mr. V. The second he was willing... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I have just received your letter of the 12th. Inst and owe you an apology for not having answered your last before this time. I have very unwell for some time past was for a fortnight unable to attend to business. This I know you will consider a sufficient apology especially as I had nothing of importance to write except what you will find in the public papers. I had received a letter from Mr... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
First Statement The charges made against Martin Van Buren Esqr on the management of the Cause of the People against John W. Thorn, Valentine N. Livingston & Henry D. Tracy, in an article signed one of the People & published in the Statesman of the 13th instant are unfounded.  We as Counsel associated with Mr. Van Buren (then Atty Genl) concurred with him in the propriety of abanding the... Continue Reading
I have persuaded Mr Phillips to send his second son to Canandaigua with materials for a new paper. He is 21 years of age & has been reading law in Philadelphia & with assistance will do well. A paper must be established there. He will leave this in a week I shall give him a few lines to you & our friends in Albany & you must give him a few hints about that quarter & whats to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I have recd your letter of the 19th. inst and regret that you should be under the impression that the Letter relative to Post Masters was not properly exhibited by me to the Post Master General. That letter contains no language which you, considering the grievances complained of, ought to regret. It requests no improper course from the Departt. It speaks warmly of injurious facts. It is evident... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Yours of the 20th inst was received in due course of mail. I entirely concur in the propriety of your course as to the publication of Varicks letter. it The venom is of that Calumny was destroyed by the light, and I congratulate you upon the probable result of the ballot for Senator. There have been indications of a determination the part of two or three of the members from this City not to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
at that dark day to <our> <state> ^disgracefull period <by> in the history of our <State>^, to which every good man revisits with humiliation & regret, when our halls of Legislation were basely contaminated, when within their Walls "corruption boiled & bubbled like a [ste]w when [. . .] and stubborn [. . .] were out-faced & Vanquished by pimps & panders—... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Our Legislature convened again on tuesday and are proceeding with composure and propriety. The convention bill has been discussed for two days and will tomorrow be rejected, it requiring you know two thirds to pass it. The whole subject will then be recommitted to a select committee who will probably report a bill authorising the sense of the people to be taken at the Spring election and if they... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I am informed that you declined signing the resolutions which were sent to Washington upon the subject of the Missouri question, upon the ground that you never authorised your name to be used as one of the Committee on that occasion. Before any steps were taken on the subject I called upon you myself, to learn if you was willing to be one of that Committee; you replied that you was so much... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
What can be the reason I cant hear from you occasionally. Is your time so much taken up in matters of more importance, that you have no leisure to write or are you afraid your letters will get into the hands of your Friend the Governor? I think you need not be ashamed of your postmaster letter. You know the rule of law is that you must take the whole story together, and assuming your charges to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Our sufferings owing to the rascality of deputy Postmasters is intolerable and Cries aloud for relief. We find it absolutely impossible to penetrate the interior with our papers and unless we can alarm them by two or three prompt removals there is no limiting the injurious consequences that may result from it. Let me therefore entreat the Postma[s]ter General to do an act of Justice and render us... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB

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