Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)

Displaying 121 - 135 of 202
In my conversations with the S of the N. he has been open & explicit in his opinion, that the V. P. can not decline the nomination without some disadvantage—in these sentiments I am convinced the S of the N. is very sincere. I have not however inferred that he would refuse to be the Candidate shd the V. P. decline. He has not said that in this Case he would accept a nomination—nor has he told... Continue Reading
Sender: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
Your letter has reached me here in the midst of a circuit & I have but time to say a word to you on the interesting points you speak of. Advise Thompson by no means to have such a meeting, it would as you say set an example for Mr Clinton ^for^ which he would give the world. The dire necessity to which he will be subjected of resorting to such nominations galls him to the quick. Such a... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have not had a moment to spare, since the Council has terminated their late disgraciful proceedings or I should have dropped you a line not in the way of condolence but rather of congratulation as your removal from office will have done much good to our cause and I am fully persuaded that it can do you no harm as the Republican party will ever take pleasure in affording that protection &... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
"The Missouri question," is a phrase, which, in the nomenclature of the moment, comprehends the question respecting the admission of Maine, as a State, into the Union; the question concerning the admission of Missouri, as a State, into the Union; the question of the prohibition of slavery, in the proposed State of Missouri; and the question concerning the toleration or prohibition of slavery, in... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Your last epistle to on the subject of Newyork politics has only served to add demonstration to my former convictions that you are totally and deplorably Ignorant not only of Mr Clinton (In true Clintonian style I name him first & also out of complaisance to you) but of the State her political Interests and the Sentiments and views of her Citizens. When you meddle with politics you are as I... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Will you believe it I never heard untill this day a lick about your troubles although I now learn that it has been a subject of newspaper discussion (but I have my hands so full in making final disposition of your glittle great men) that I seldom look in papers out of the State), according to all appearances you have been shamefully abused. There must have been some gross misrepresentation &... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have received your letter of yesterday ^the 3d Inst^ in which you feel yourself constrained to admit "that I may consider it extraordinary that you should set up your judgment in opposition to that of the very able and respectable counsel whose written opinion I handed to you, and that the weight of their character made you seriously distrust your own Judgment." To this you could with propriety... Continue Reading
I recd. yours this morning. I am no rampant politician you know, and feel sorry that we should be called to contend about minor points, when we have matters of such great moment to attend to. I have a perfect recollection of all that has taken place on the subject of the conversation, & have seen the commns. in the papers as from the Ch. J. & the Genl. with astonishment. While the former... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I rejoice to hear of your improvements & prospects and much approve your determination to travel, it will give me pgreat pleasure to let you have my horse. You will find travelling on him delightfull & may [. . .] for him when you please. I should like if it <is> practicable that you took some trusty servant [w]ith you, you will find it very laborious and oppressive for the first... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I leave here for Washington tomorrow. Shall probably be gone nearly three weeks. I am very much embarrassed in my own mind how to manage about the District Judgeship. The applicants are numerous and most of them my particular friends. I believe I must give a faithful and impartial account of the several candidates to the President. I insisted he make any inquiry of me and leave him pretty much to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
By the mail of today I received your letter of the 2d. instant. I wrote to you on the day of the V. P. departure. Since then I have seen and frankly told him what passed between the V. P. and myself; holding back nothing which occured in our conference, or the letter which I wrote to you respecting the same, or in the confidential & personal note in wh. I told you that from my conversations... Continue Reading
Sender: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I shall go to Newyork early, perhaps as early as Wednesday at all events on Saturday & may not therefore see you again as I consider you on your Journey. You must take some trusty servant with you as we will feel uneasy other wise, the expence must be managed in this way some of your friends must lend you a horse, you must pay his Wags which cannot be much & I will pay his travelling... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Shortly before I left New York I received your letter of the 30th ult, but being very much engaged in preparing to come here had not time to acknowledge it. You have doubtless seen through the public papers that Mr Skinner has been appointed the Judge and Sutherland the District Attorney. This was done before I arrived here, and I can of course give you no more information on the subject than... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I am one more in Charge of the office. But how long I shall retain the station is very doubtful. My Reinstatement I am told was in opposition to the wishes of Mr. Cheves, who is now trying his strength with the new Board with the view of removing Mr Smith. If he succeds I shall probably be again subjected to his Caprices & perhaps again removed. In a pecuniary point of view, the office is... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Since the receipt of yours I have been on a jaunt to the northward partly to see the canal & partly for other purposes as you will probably see by the papers. This ^has^ prevented my writing to you before & now I have nothing to say except, that we are all well & all feel the most lively solicitude for your health, that having the most unlimited confidence in your good sense &... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB

Pages

Subscribe to Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)