Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)

Displaying 241 - 255 of 270
I have just received your letter of the 17th. and feel myself justly exposed to the gentle reproof you give me for not writing before. But I do assure you, I have had my hands full here I found the business of my office some what behind hand, and being unacquainted with the details it has taken me some time to get properly under way, as we sailors say. But the current business of the office I am... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Reflecting upon the occurrance of last evening, Mr. Mc. In[t]yres case ought to have been brought up by me in a very diferent manner from what it was, assurances ought then to have been required that he should not be amoved from his office, by the Council about to be made, I feel a strong conviction that he is an honest and upright man, ^&^ a great proportion of this Community are of the Same... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
In answer to your letter of yesterday I can only give you rather general information. Our prospects are favorable from every quarter. Increased majorities compared with the last Governor election. In Albany K. has 602 majority. You have 26 less than the other Republican candidates. This shameful under handed attack upon you, you will see has had but very little effect. It is a little difficult at... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The undersigned Republican members of the Senate and assembly from the middle district having Witnessed with regret three Republican nominations for the Senate from that district viz Charles E Dudley from the County of Albany, yourself from the County of Otsego & John T. More from the County of Delaware, (while only two Senators are to be chosen) take the liberty of addressing you on the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
You tell me, my friend, that I must excuse you for not writing; and at the same time, you refer me to your letter to our common friend. <Tho'> as kind as it is delicate. I have seen that letter, and have perused it, at length. I perceive the delicacies and perplexities of the situation, in which you have to act so important a part; and with, or without, your request, I excuse you. But let... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The Letter signed by the Chief Justice Mr Cantine & yourself, requesting me to meet Mr T. at Philadelphia on the 12th Inst. was handed to me, by Judge VanNess, on saturday evening. The situation of my business absolutely forbids my leaving Washington before the 13th on the morning of which day I had made my arrangements to set out for N.York. Today or tomorrow the question of indemnifying the... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I do not remember why the cause ^of Wheeler^ was put off. They must know that. Wigram is the Witness to the lease & as such is certainly necessary if they will not admit the execution which I presume they will. There has always been great uncertainty as to what the Ptff. claims & I do not suppose that Wms. knows exactly. He has heretofore recovered all the over plus lands & for the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The symtoms of my Daughter have for a few days been more favorable, but not to justify me to leave her any time <illegible> I regret that I could not have been at Albany long before this, but as the time is altogether uncertain, I have this day wrote a confidential Letter to the Gov. on the subject of yourself, and have advised him that I would by the same Mail which carries his Letter... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
On the 10th. Inst. I addressed a line to Mr Van Buren, acknowledging the favour receipt of your letter of the 3rd, and engaging to meet Mr Tillotson at Philadelphia on the 14th foreseeing, at that time, nothing in the state of my business, which would prevent my leaving Washington this morning. My engagement was not, however, intended to be dependent on any contingency of that sort, for I had... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Our friend Mr. Watson desires some appointment for his Nephew Capt. Watson in your department. I have not the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with Capt Watson but am persuaded that Mr. Watson's recommendation will receive full credit with you according to its import. Knowing that it will be highly acceptable to you to be of service to Mr Watson, any further solicitations on my part would be... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
You ask why letters were written in your ^my^ behalf for Senator, to members in different parts of the State & the matter kept a profound secret from my friend. My only answer is that they were written without my knowledge & that I did not desire the appointment. Some of my friends here informed me that they had written such letters. I felt unwilling to interfere with their wishes &... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
After a frank & friendly communication with our friend General Peter B. Porter relative to a successor to Govr. Tompkins, I am happy to inform you that altho’ he still feels the full force of the objections stated in his letter to you of the 14th int. Yet if such should be the State of things that a majority of the republicans really deem the use of his name in any way essential to the... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Mr Sanford has recommended to you Roger Skinner Esqr. to supply the vacancy in the office of District Attorney for the State of Newyork produced by the ^his (Mr Sanfords)^ appointment of Mr Sanford to the Senate of the United States. I take the liberty of uniting with him in the recommendation of Mr Skinner and to express my solicitude for his appointment. He is in every respect qualifyed to... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
Permit me to rejoice for myself & the State, that your indisposition is so far removed as to <permit> suffer you to resume your seat in the Senate, & your attentions to your friends. That I am so flatteringly estimated in that number is peculiarly gratifying to me, as I can see in it evidence of personal respect only, as in my humble sphere to which a few days will now return me,... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I am much indebted to you for the continuation of our correspondence, and, expecting, daily, for some months past, to escape from the trifling & vexatious duties which occupied me, I intended, seizing, the first moments’ leisure to make you an apology for my apparent neglect. In your letter of the 9th instant you have been liberal enough to account for my silence. I need not trouble you with... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB

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