Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)

Displaying 181 - 195 of 298
No. 1. The following is a copy of the notice: A meeting of the inhabitants of this city & county of Albany, is hereby requested at the capitol, this Evening, at 6, for the purpose of expressing their opinions on the expediency of prohibiting the farther extension of slavery in the U. S. Dec. 16 1819. (published in the Argus of that day.) (signed) John Tayler, Amb. Spencer, St. Van Rensselaer... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Mr. Van Buren, from the select committee to whom was committed the bill, entitled "an act authorising the comptroller to loan to the general government a sum of money sufficient to pay off the militia of this state, who have been ordered into the service of the United States," reported as follows, to wit: THAT from the best information the committee have been able to obtain, and which they think... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I, Abraham Van Buren Do make and publish the following as a Codicil to my last Will and Testament hereunto annexed, bearing date the Eighteenth day of February last, and to be considered as part of my said last Will & Testament. First, I do hereby give devise and bequeath unto my beloved Wife Mary all my Household furniture and personal Estate (except what is herein after except’d, & what... Continue Reading
At a period when we have just emerged from a bloody but succe[ss]ful and glorious struggle for national hono[r] and existence, an opportunity presents itself to express our gratitude for services rendered in that contest; and to proclaim to the world by our suffrages, that is the calm of peace we are not unmindful of the Statesman who was the shield of his country in the storm of war. In DANIEL D... Continue Reading
We have examined a map of the state of New-York, including the upper part of the state of Pennsylvania, published by Mr. AMOS LAY, and it appears to us to be accurate, and to contain all the counties up to this time correctly designated, and to be well worthy of public patronage.
Sender: MVB, Sender: James Kent, Sender: Ambrose Spencer, Sender: Stephen Van Rensselaer III
at that dark day to <our> <state> ^disgracefull period <by> in the history of our <State>^, to which every good man revisits with humiliation & regret, when our halls of Legislation were basely contaminated, when within their Walls "corruption boiled & bubbled like a [ste]w when [. . .] and stubborn [. . .] were out-faced & Vanquished by pimps & panders—... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Our Legislature convened again on tuesday and are proceeding with composure and propriety. The convention bill has been discussed for two days and will tomorrow be rejected, it requiring you know two thirds to pass it. The whole subject will then be recommitted to a select committee who will probably report a bill authorising the sense of the people to be taken at the Spring election and if they... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I am informed that you declined signing the resolutions which were sent to Washington upon the subject of the Missouri question, upon the ground that you never authorised your name to be used as one of the Committee on that occasion. Before any steps were taken on the subject I called upon you myself, to learn if you was willing to be one of that Committee; you replied that you was so much... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
What can be the reason I cant hear from you occasionally. Is your time so much taken up in matters of more importance, that you have no leisure to write or are you afraid your letters will get into the hands of your Friend the Governor? I think you need not be ashamed of your postmaster letter. You know the rule of law is that you must take the whole story together, and assuming your charges to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Our sufferings owing to the rascality of deputy Postmasters is intolerable and Cries aloud for relief. We find it absolutely impossible to penetrate the interior with our papers and unless we can alarm them by two or three prompt removals there is no limiting the injurious consequences that may result from it. Let me therefore entreat the Postma[s]ter General to do an act of Justice and render us... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I called to pay my respects this morning as I leave town this day but you were not at home. I beg you to believe that I am sensibly obliged by your friendly attentions & shall take an opportunity of expressing the same more fully. I should feel regret at the hostility evinced by part of the delegation towards me if I thought that my political & personal conduct authorised it. Not thinking... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I have communicated the papers sent by you relative to several Post Offices, to the Post Master General, with my earnest solicitation for his immediate & effectual interference. He will do all that can be done. His determination has been already announced, last week to the Post Masters, to remove instantly any and Post Master who impedes the due circulation of papers & Letters. You may... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I offer you my cordial congratulations on your appointment to the Senate: Mr. Sanford without doubt feels the disappointment, but bears it without complaint, at least I hear of none. From you and others I have been in expectation of the arrival here of Mr Rensselaer, but he has not yet come. I shall avail myself of the earliest opportunity to express to him such opinions relative to our state... Continue Reading
Sender: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
By the time this reaches you, Mr. C’s “short session” will probably have closed, and you be left in the quiet enjoyment of some repose, after the labor and exertion to which you have been subjected in exposing the base practices of a corrupt combination against the Republicanism of the State.  The assembly Report, has injured Clinton essentially with us. The matter, the manner &c so palpably... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
You once promised to consider me as a Client, I have addressed you as such, and as a friend, but you have been as silent as the Tombs, I now address you as a Gentleman, without any wish of drawing you into a correspondence, but Sir as you have done me and the Orphans under my protection, a serious injury, I trust you will not hesitate to use your exertion in repairing the injury you have done, by... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB

Pages

Subscribe to Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)