Series 3 (17 February 1815-2 December 1821)

Displaying 151 - 165 of 298
At a meeting of the inhabitants of the city and county of Albany, held at the capitol, in the city of Albany, on Tuesday the 21st of December, 1819, in pursuance of public notice, to express their opinions upon the subject of extending slavery into the territories of the United States westward of the river Mississippi—the hon. John Taylor, was called to the chair, and Teunis Van Vechten, Esq.... Continue Reading
NOTICE ☞A meeting of the inhabitants of this city and county of Albany, is hereby requested at the capitol in the city of Albany, this evening, at six o'clock, for the purpose of expressing their opinions on the expediency of prohibiting the further extension of slavery in the United States.
The republican members of the legislature, at the close of the last session, announced to their constituents their firm conviction that ^you their conviction that the prosperity of the republican pary and so^ the welfare of the state required a change of the Chief Magistrate. Subsequent events have proved the correctness of this opinion and enforced the expediency of this measure. While a doubt... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I understand that the Steam Boat Fire Fly has regularly plied as a passage Boat between Newyork and Newburgh for the two last years. Not a cent of money has been recieved at the Treasury for the tax on Passengers in that Boat, nor have any Accounts been rendered of the Tax. Have the goodness therefore to proceed against the Master of the Boat under the act entitled "An act respecting navigable... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
You will doubtless remember that when at Louis's during the sitting of the Supreme court you mentioned to me that chief Justice Spencer had declared to Genl. Brown that the Republican party no longer existed as such & that henceforth our Citizens would be divided among the Supporters & opposers of the present administration. The sentiments thus attributed to the chief Justice being in... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I am much gratified by your letter to an unsuccessful candidate but believing that I understand your character, it does not surprise me. Although you are a politician, I believe you want the faculty which most of them have, of cutting friends whose popularity seems to be on the wane—but even with this draw back upon your advancement you have qualified yourself by example as well as precept, to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
As the Executors of John Pruyn ^decd.^ or some of them, seem to trifle with me, respecting the Claim I have on the Estate. I wish you therefore Issue a writ agt. the Executors to wit John P. Beekman, Lucas J Van Alen ^& James VanDerpoel^ Exos. of the last Will &c & Codicile of Jno Bruyn decd. My demand is an a/c. of about $1000. I spoke to you some time Since respecting [. . .]... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I find by a newspaper just come to hand that the publication of the correspondence ^with Govr T. in between^ 1814 is preceded by that or rather part of that between you & myself. I cannot but regret that my intention in this particular was not rightly understood. My ^hasty^ letter was written under the impression that nothing would go to the press but the original correspondence with Govr.... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The Republican members of the Legislature held their caucus last night on the subject of Senator to Congress and after a fair temperate & manly debate unanimously concured in the nomination of your hble. Servt. for that place. On the ballot the Votes were for Mr Sanford 24 for myself 58—one of Mr. S. friends and six of mine were absent. The appointment takes place on Tuesday, the utmost... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The enclosed Letter will explain to you what we wish. The Vice President is apprized that a copy has been sent to you, as you will see. If he has left Washington, you will see the propriety of sending a speedy answer. That answer must be, My Dear Friend, that in the event of the Vice President's insisting, upon it, you will consent to our wishes. In no other event do we urge it. You will see, how... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Yours of the 25th. & 28th. have been duly received & I return you my thanks for your prompt attention to a subject so interesting to us. There has been a degree of coyness between our friends on this subject which has been troublesome to me. I was in hopes it would be peculiarly in your power to dispel it, as I know the extent of their confidence in & the warmth of their friendship... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I have only time to say that since the receipt of yours I have seen the Vice President & stated to him what I understood was reported as his opinion on the Missouri question & he informed me that he had never entertained or expressed the sentiments attributed to him. That he did not think that the restriction unconstitutional nor had he ever questioned its expediency. At some future day I... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I enclose you a report which I am told is highly satisfactory to our friends & annoying to our enemies. I have written rather a scolding or fretting letter to the Secy of the Navy to day in the hope of rousing the torpid & hair splitting men at W. to take ground in our favour & have omitted to speak as favorably of our prospects as I might with to propriety have done. I can with... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
The attorney-general, to whom was referred the petition of Stephen Marvin and others, inhabitants of the county of Putnam, reported as follows, to wit: THAT from the extreme importance of the subject embraced by the reference made to him, the attorney-general has felt it his duty to present to the Legislature the facts and allegations in relation to the claim in question, as much in detail as the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The vacancy which now exists in the seat of government, by the elevation of his excellency Daniel D. Tompkins to the office of Vice President of the U. States, and his subsequent surrender into the hands of the people of the supreme executive power, have imposed upon us the duty of recommending to your suffrages candidates worthy of your confidence. In designating a successor for the high... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB, Sender: John Woodworth

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