Series 13 (1 January 1845-31 December 1848)

Move to Free Soil Party (Jan. 1845-Dec. 1848): Break from Polk and Democratic Party, Free Soil Party nomination, 1848 election.

Displaying 1 - 11 of 11
Memorandum I recd. this letter on the evening of the 26th. Feby at Lindenwald. Deeming it indispensable to consult Mr Wright before I replied I sent my son Martin to Albany the same night to give Mr Wright time to <try> reflect & give me his opinion. The next day ^28th^ I wrote by mail to Mr Polk that I had prepared a communication in reply, which my son Smith would convey to him to... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Your letter of this memorable 22nd was received on Saturday. You judged rightly in supposing that I would concur in the view you take, differing widely as they do from the suggestions of <illegible> letter. I did not hope from the misgivings expressed by some of the most strenuous of the Barnburners that the true Democracy of New York, were prepared for the bold, decisive stand indicated by... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I take the liberty of sending to you an address recently made before a portion of my constituents. Convinced as I am, that the principle involved in the "Proviso" is right, and that the sanction of Legislative Extenssion is absolutely necessary to preserve the Territory we may acquire, from the in-roads of Slavery, I cannot but hope, that you view it with favour, and at a proper time, and under... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I should have thanked you several days since, as I now do very sincerely for the copy of your admirable speech. It is ^a^ simple, ^eloquent^ argumentative & patriotic throughout ^production^ & does you much credit. You do me but justice in believing that of the proper ^<the> of the a proper^ time & ^under proper^ circumstances should come in which it would ^there would <in... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I returned home last evening from a visit to Tioga, one of the Counties of my District, and found awaiting me, your acceptable letter of the 13th inst. I feel the death of Mr Wright at this time, as all overwhelming an irreperable calamity. There was more moral & political power united in his person, than in that of any other American Citizen. Silas Wright has left behind him no living man in... Continue Reading
I presume that there is a disposition to attack Ingersolls history of the War of 1812. It is said to abound with errors of fact & errors of opinion. Commodore Stewart is out in the Courier & Enquirer of the 18th, (Saturday last,) in defence of himself & Bainbridge for ^against^ the statements of Ingersoll relative to their motives in <dodging> the employment of the navy &c.... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I thank you kindly for your two letters. I have found them full of interest and regard them as the commencement of a new series designed to shew forth the diversified talents of their author. If any one should hereafter presume to advance the opinion that my old friend Mr Worth cannot write gravely on grave subjects I shall possess the evidence to refute so unfounded an opinion. As some proof of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
As a friend of your respected father—one who fell with him, politically, in 1840, and ardently desired his nomination and re-election 1844—I take occasion to address you for the purpose of placing you in possession of some facts connected with the machinations of an intriguer, who under the guise of professed friendship, done more than any other man in the United States to defeat the nomination... Continue Reading
Recipient: John Van Buren
Frequent conversations lately with our mutual and excellent friend Gilpin in which you were often mentioned, recalled me, as I told him, to a resolution of long standing, tho' long suspended too, to address your letter from these supposed headquarters of News Not that I have any news to tell: for between the very little, if any, which I learn from my station and ought not to mention, and the... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I recd. your letter last Eveng whilst on the wing for this place. In that spirit of entire candour which has hitherto ^& ever shall^ distinguished, ^& ever shall^ our intercourse I must say to you that it has caused me not a considerable embarrassment, and not a little pain. If any honest and unbiased Democrat in the U. States was ^had been^ asked in view of the ^circumstances^ of the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Your letter of the 27th was handed to me by your son at sun-set on last evening. My letter to you of the 1st will inform you of what has been done. If I have committed an error, I can only say it was unintentional. It pains me to think that you may suppose that I have acted unkindly towards yourself or your friends. I am surrounded now every moment, and have scarcely time to write this note. I... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
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