Series 12 (5 March 1841-31 December 1844)

Defeat and 1844 Campaign (5 March 1841-31 December 1844): Return to Kinderhook, 1842 national tour, Texas annexation, 1844 Democratic convention, 1844 election.

Displaying 1 - 15 of 89
I have to acknowledge ^with pleasure^ the receipt of your letter explanatory of ^containing^ the reasons by which ^governd^ your course in relation to the proceedings at Baltimore. For the disposition desire it evinces that the explanation should prove satisfyactory to me of your personal regard I thank you very sincerely of the right I feel confident that I have never divested myself of the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Absence from home has prevented an earlier compliance with your request. I regret that it is not in my power to <refer> you to any <illegible> containing the information you desire, although I do not doubt that such an <illegible> may be found. The Chief <illegible> offices may be <easily> ascertained but the inferior offices will be more difficult
Sender: MVB
I have had the honor to receive your letter inviting me to preside at the Democratic Mass meeting to be held at Albany on the second day of October.  For this mark of respect on the part of the Committee of arrangements, and for the very obliging terms in which you have been pleased to communicate it, I return my respectful & very grateful acknowledgements. Having felt myself constrained by... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I should do injustice, as well to yourselves, as to the patriotic citizens you represent, and to my own feelings, were I to withhold my grateful acknowledgments for the kind and complimentary terms in which you have been pleased to invite me to attend the mass meeting of the democracy of Northern New-York on the 11th September—the anniversary of the battle of Plattsburgh. The democracy of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Dr. G.W. Westcott, a brother-in-law of our lieutenant governor, and as I am informed, an accomplished Dentist, proposes to spend a short time in Alabama. I have not the pleasure of Dr. Westcott's personal acquaintance: I can only speak upon the information of those who know him, and from whose representations I am well satisfied that he is fully entitled to your respect and confidence.
Sender: MVB
The Dr. & myself have been not a little embarrassed by not seeing or hearing from you. I had shewn him your letter in respect to the payment of $6000 in August & have for the second time made arrangements based upon assurances that I would receive a payment myself, in which I can not be disappointed without serious inconvenience. Let me my dear Sir beg your early & effectual attention... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have refrained from writing you a single Letter, during the present campaign—and I deeply regret, that I should the first one, which I should have to write, would be one, which gives me as much pain to write, as any which ever came from my pen. I need not tell you, Mr. Van Buren, the feelings which I entertain towards you. Trusted at all times with a kindness, a liberality, a distinction far ... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
You are deserted. Ritchie, Roane, & Stevenson are all out against you on the Texas question; positively, openly, and unequivocally against you. Arrangements are now, at this very hour, being made to take up some other candidate, and of this be assured if there be a God in Heaven.
Recipient: MVB
The pressure of my engagements since my return must be my apology for not having sooner acknowledged the interesting communications I have recently recd. from you. I sincerely hope you will not fail to make us your long promised visit in the course of the Summer. I can give you more agreeable quarters, I am sure, than are at any time to be found on Penn. Avenue, & particular at this moment of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have offered Lord Morpeth an introduction to you, which he was happy to recieve. Your knowledge of his high character renders it unnecessary that I should say any thing to commend him to your kind attentions. I know enough of both to know that you will be highly pleased with him. Our people here regretted your non appearance very much. Our success is permanent, Let me hear from you occasionally... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
No one I assure can be more sensible of the Utility of your institution, or more sincerely desirious for its success than myself; and I feel highly honored by the application you have been instructed to make to me by its members. It will of course be very agreeable to me to see the Gentlemen of the Committee, but I think it most proper to apprise you at once that I shall be under the necessity of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have recd. your check for the balance of the Pew & beg you to accept my sincere thanks for your friendly attention in the matter. I have not to my knowledge ever had a certificate or evidence of the transfer of the Pew to me. If when I get settled I will search my papers but have no idea of finding it.
Sender: MVB
Sir Joseph de Courcy Laffan, who has been introduced to me as an English gentleman of great respectability; and professing much personal merit, proposes to spend a few days at Washington during the Extra Session. He visits us with liberal friendly feelings, and is sincerely desirous of understanding our Country and its institutions in their true character. His friend has asked letters of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Levi Woodbury
I am fearful that I spoke so indifferently about the $800 as to induce you to believe it altogether unimportant whether I recd. it or not. Indeed I substantially so regarded it when I wrote, but having been now for several weeks in the hands House furnishers and House repairers & gardeners &c &c I find that the payment of that amount to my credit in the Bank of America in this City in... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I thank you for your kind letter. The idea of <illegible>, at any time, towards Mr Cassidy is entirely <illegible>. No motive for such treatmt ever existed, & I am <illegible> the <illegible> to indulge any such feelings. Of the other matter I can not speak with so much certainty. All I recollect, distinctly, is, that I had a clear opinion that the office ought to be... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Aaron Vanderpoel

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