Documents

If a search feature contains "▼" in the title, click on it to reveal options to select.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
I have forwarded to the author of the enclosed, a letter addressed to yourself, (as he requests) in behalf of the object he solicits. After dispatching my letter, it occurred to me that I had better present to you his own communication which is a faithful type of its author, clear, strong, direct.... Continue Reading
It is a great while since I have had the pleasure to hear from you. I have been confined at home almost all the summer and have had a sick family. We look with great interest to your state, but we do not understand the state of parties with you. At one time we see a Convention at Utica, which makes... Continue Reading
I am somewhat puzzled in addressing you; and, if we did not live in a free Country, my modesty perhaps would keep me from approaching you. Circumstances indeed seem to be daily making a political distinction of rank between us (if in such a country as ours rank follows office.) I am in status quo;... Continue Reading
I thank you for your friendly letter. I have long represented to my friends at Washington my Convictions of the approach of the present state of parties. In our Richmond from Causes I have already alluded to, party violence and proscription run higher than even in the days of the Black-Cockade. In... Continue Reading
I have just returned home from a journey of more than five thousand miles, after an absence of nearly three months; and altho' much exhausted by travelling, by mental labor, & by the influence of an enfeebling climate; I am unwilling to withhold the expression of my opinion upon the strange... Continue Reading
You are deserted. Ritchie, Roane, & Stevenson are all out against you on the Texas question; positively, openly, and unequivocally against you. Arrangements are now, at this very hour, being made to take up some other candidate, and of this be assured if there be a God in Heaven.
I have refrained from writing you a single Letter, during the present campaign—and I deeply regret, that I should the first one, which I should have to write, would be one, which gives me as much pain to write, as any which ever came from my pen. I need not tell you, Mr. Van Buren, the feelings... Continue Reading