Remarks

For congressional remarks that are not speeches.

Displaying 181 - 195 of 239
Mr. VAN BUREN said, that the object of the bill was, to provide a means whereby Commissioners could obtain evidence, freed from some difficulties which they now labored under. By the existing law, the privilege was only conditional, and merely permitted the Commissioner to take affidavits, and withheld the power of constraining the appearance of witnesses. By the general law, this power belonged... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN was not satisfied with the motion of the gentleman from Vermont. He thought it would endanger the passage of the bill, as, when it should hereafter be called up, other orders of the day might intervene, and the bill at length fail of being acted upon. If, after all that had been done, the gentleman wished more information, he should be willing to accede to his request; but, if this... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN said, that every step the discussion had progressed had riveted his original convictions, that Congress, in passing the bill, with the section in question, would not only transcend its constitutional power, but establish a system which would be most mischievous and oppressive in its operation.  So thinking, he had intended to have replied to the other observations of the Senator... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN addressed the Senate in opposition to the amendment offered by Mr. REED, and in support of the reconsideration suggested by Mr. BARTON.
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Mr. VAN BUREN said, that his situation and sentiments imposed upon him the duty of expressing himself on this subject. He had always been in favor of a bankrupt system, including merchants and traders only; and he had abandoned all hope of a bankrupt bill, if it were to extend to those classes of persons included in the ninety-third section. He had, during the last discussion, directed his... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN opposed the amendment, as he had the ninety-third section, on the ground of its inconsistency and error. It was an erroneous idea that bankruptcy was a boon to the debtor merchant; or, that the bill could be made to serve God and Mammon, by combining two things totally at variance. It was a law of pains and penalties; giving to the creditor certain powers over the debtor, on his... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN said it was due to the gentleman from New Hampshire, to state that the remark he had alluded to, was made by Mr. V. B. In stating the various plans which had been proposed to relieve the Western States, he had mentioned that one had been a bill reported some years ago in the House of Representatives, and which had also been offered by way of amendment to the bill proposed last year... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN said it was with some relutance that he relinquished his intention of vindicating the act of 1802, from what he considered the unjust attack made upon it by the gentleman from Rhode Island. The recommitment of this bill to the Judiciary Committee, on the resolution of the gentleman from New Hampshire, with the explanations which had been made by the gentlemen from New Hampshire,... Continue Reading
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Messrs. JOHNSON, of Ken. HOLMES, MILLS, VAN BUREN, EATON, and HAYNE, entered, also, into the debate, chiefly in explanation of the considerations that had led the Senate to make the existing change in its rules; their experience of the effects of the change, and their views of its propriety or impropriety—the comparative merits of the two modes of appointing Committees, &c. &c. (As the... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN moved to lay the bill on the table, which motion prevailed.
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The bill from the House, for the relief of Elizabeth Lewis, was then taken up: and, after some explanation by Messrs VAN BUREN and HOLMES, it was ordered to a third reading.
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The bill from the House for the preservation and repair of Cumberland Road, was read the first time, and on the question shall the bill be read a second time, a long discussion took place, in which Messrs. TAZEWELL, BENTON, HARRISON, SMITH, HENDRICKS, FINDLAY, MACON, KANE, BERRIEN, EATON, ROWAN, HOLMES, NOBLE, VAN BUREN, CHAMBERS, and WHITE, took part. The question was decided in the affirmative... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN said he rose principally to call for the yeas and nays; but while he was up, he would make one remark on this subject. He could not vote for this bill, for he did not believe that this Government possessed the Constitutional power to make these roads and canals, or to grant the money to make them; but, while he entertained this opinion, he did not wish to indulge in feelings of... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN said, that this subject had some time since been referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, by a resolution of a gentleman from Illinois, (Mr. KANE.) The Committee had considered the subject attentively, and it was probable they would report to-morrow. It would be better, therefore, to lay the resolution on the table, until the report should be made, and then they would be able to... Continue Reading
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Messrs. WHITE and VAN BUREN were in favor of settling these claims by some mode, without delay, as the interest of the United States would suffer injury if the lands were offered for sale with the claims hanging over them.
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