MVB Senate remarks on the vice presidency, 12 February 1828

MVB Senate remarks on the vice presidency, 12 February 1828

IN SENATE.

Mr. VAN BUREN spoke at some length against the idea of any power being delegated to the President to stay debate by calling to order for words spoken. He looked upon the principle as monstrous, and as threatening future consequences of a most serious nature. He did not say, that, at present, any evil would arise from it. But a time might come, when the aspect of things would have been changed. The Senate was most likely to come into collision with the Departments of the Government. The Vice President being one of the Administration, he would most likely coincide with his colleagues. And, suppose he, with the power, should, in the discussion of the measures or conduct, take upon himself to stay debate, and force any member, who touched upon the Administration, in his performance of his public duties, to take his seat? Such things might be anticipated from the admission of a principle like that which had been set up by the gentlemen on the other side. He was not displeased with that part of the amendment of the gentleman from Connecticut which gave an appeal to the Senate, and he should vote for it when it came in a proper shape.

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