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It is not proposed to discuss the merits or demerits of either the friends or the opponents of the late war. So far, however, at the incidents connected with that contest have became a part of the history of our country; and so far as their notice is deemed necessary to a true develpment of your character, a retrospect will be taken. I now charge you, sir, with aiding and abetting those men who... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Before proceeding to notice your official acts, I shall, very briefly, recur to two incidents which may be considered indicative of the cast of your mind. You well know, sir, that for a time you was employed in the office of the late Judge William P. Van Ness. You may remember, and if you do not, you ought, the circumstances under which you was first noticed by that gentleman. Whether he was, or... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
you are styled “the Magician.” You are flattered and pleased with the appellation. It is a misnomer. It has tended, however, to increase your influence with the unprincipled office seeker. It has drawn around you a band of mercenaries, who have ministered to your vanity, and pampered an “unchastened ambition.” There is no man in our country whose character is so imperfectly understood, as that of... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Through the medium of your paper, I propose, with your permission, to address a series of letters, to the Hon. Martin Van Buren, Vice President of the U. States. It is my wish to bring before the American people, a true history of this gentleman’s career. I shall commence with his early days, and detail such facts as will, in my estimation, induce the freemen of this country to pause, before they... Continue Reading
Communication. The CHANCELLOR has observed that an anonymous writer in the Argus of Tuesday, under the signature of Amicus Juris Consultus, has thought proper to charge him with using some offensive expressions in the course of the discussions which took place in the late Council of Revision.— The expressions or detached words imputed to him, appear not to have the most distant connection with... Continue Reading
Sender: James Kent
Recipient: MVB
You had my permission to use my name as a committee to call a meeting of our citizens to express their opinion on the Missouri Question, & the propriety of your doing so has not been questioned by me.— You surely cannot suppose, that the use of my name for that purpose, imposed on me an obligation to sign whatever memorial might be agreed upon by the meeting.— Being out of town when it was... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
The jury, by their special verdict, found, that on the 12th of August, 1811, Barry “did go without the limits, to wit, into the enclosure of one Henry Vrooman, which was formerly included within the liberties of the gaol; but by a subsequent survey, (made, however, before the execution of the bond, on which the suit was brought,) one part of the said enclosure, which had been separated by a fence... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I HAVE recently observed in the Albany Gazette, your objections, as a member of the Council of Revision, to several of the laws passed at the last session of the Legislature. Understanding that the laws, to which you have objected with so much zeal and sensibility, passed the Senate with the approbation of about three-fourths of the members, and the House of Assembly with nearly two-thirds, and... Continue Reading
Sender: Samuel Young
Recipient: James Kent
The enlightened view which the Senate has taken of the great events which have lately transpired, and of their probable influence upon the interest and destiny of the United States, displays wisdom and patriotism, worthy of that dignified body. Their favorable notice of my official conduct in the recent emergency, receives the most respectful acknowledgments; & a continuance of their... Continue Reading
Recipient: New York Senate
AN ACT to encourage Privateering Associations. WHEREAS a barbarous warfare on our coast and frontiers, by pillage and conflagration, is carried on by the enemy, and a determination is avowed, to lay waste our cities and habitations, and make a common ruin of both public and private property, to the usages of civilized warfare: Wherefore, it has become expedient and necessary, that the Legislature... Continue Reading
AN ACT To Authorise the Raising of Troops for the Defense of this State. I. Be it enacted by the People of the state of New-York, represented in Senate and Assembly, That it shall and may be lawful for his Excellency the Governor, by general orders, to call into actual service from the militia of this state, twelve thousand able-bodied and effective men, to be raised in the manner prescribed by... Continue Reading
AN ACT to authorise the raising of two regiments of men of colour. BE it enacted by the people of the state of New-York, represented in senate and assembly, That the governor of the state of New-York be, and he is hereby authorised to raise, by voluntary enlistment, two regiments of free men of color, for the defence of the state, for three years unless sooner discharged. And be it further... Continue Reading
AN ACT authorising additional pay to be made to the volunteers, and for paying the militia called into service by the state authority. BE it enacted by the people of the state of New-York, represented in senate and assembly, That the governor shall cause to be paid to each non commissioned officer, musician and private, of the volunteer corps, and to the legal representatives of those who may be... Continue Reading
AN ACT to authorise the raising a corps of sea-fencibles. Be it enacted by the people of the state of New-York, represented in senate and assembly, That the governor of the state of New-York be, and he is hereby authorised to raise for three years, unless sooner discharged, twenty companies of sea-fencibles, who may be employed as well on the land as on the water, for the defence of the port and... Continue Reading
I owe you an apology for not having sooner acknowledged the receipt of your obliging letter of 26th of May. My opinions on the subject of the power of Congress over Slave Property in the Southern States, are so well understood by my friends, that I am surprised that an attempt to impose upon the public respecting them should be hazarded. The subject is, in my judgment, exclusively under the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB

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