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I hope you will not fail to lay before your readers, the very interesting letter from Chancellor Kent to Mr. Hoffman. It cannot fail to be highly gratifying to every real friend of the judiciary, and well wisher of the chancellor. They have witnessed with regret the unceasing attempts which have been for some time making by some of his judicial friends, to draw him with them into all the petty... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
If I were to confine my views to you in the abstract, without reference to analogous cases, which constantly occur, I should not hesitate to consider your present standing in the community, a moral paradox—a political phenomenon. When I take the gauge and dimensions of your intellectual endowments and acquisitions, and perceive how small and scanty they are—and when I view your habitual... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The crisis of our fate is rapidly approaching. Already do we experience the diminution of our numbers and the falling of off wise and good men. Even Dudley begins to shake in the wind—and to inquire, like his original in the fable, whether, if the enemy succeeds, his fate will be rendered worse or his panniers more burthensome.— Van Kleeck already brandishes the sword of defiance, and threatens a... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
In all discomfitures and defeats, whether political, civil, or military, the blame will necessarily be imputed to the chief of the enterprise or undertaking. Within a few years, you have arrived to factitious importance, and the eye of curiosity and criticism has, for some time, been fixed upon you. Whether your balloon-like elevation is founded on wisdom or cunning—on solidity of talent or... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
There are some men, who are always the dupes of their own vanity, and who like a squirrel in a rotary cage, or a horse in a Troy Team-Boat, really think that they are in a state of advancement, when they have made no progress at all. This is emphatically your case. Under the influence of a sanguine temperament, like your great prototype, Aaron Burr, you believe that you can cut and carve as you... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
D. War Department, December 11, 1838. Sir: The letter addressed by your excellency to the President of the United States under date of the 7th instant, was received yesterday, and referred to this Department, where it has received that respectful and earnest consideration to which the high source whence it emanates, and the importance of the subject, entitle it. In this communication your... Continue Reading
I should do injustice, as well to yourselves, as to the patriotic citizens you represent, and to my own feelings, were I to withhold my grateful acknowledgments for the kind and complimentary terms in which you have been pleased to invite me to attend the mass meeting of the democracy of Northern New-York on the 11th September—the anniversary of the battle of Plattsburgh. The democracy of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Dr. G.W. Westcott, a brother-in-law of our lieutenant governor, and as I am informed, an accomplished Dentist, proposes to spend a short time in Alabama. I have not the pleasure of Dr. Westcott's personal acquaintance: I can only speak upon the information of those who know him, and from whose representations I am well satisfied that he is fully entitled to your respect and confidence.
Sender: MVB
I have now briefly reviewed your political career, from 1812 to 1820 inclusive. During this period you was a member of the state Senate. It will be observed, that reference has only been made to the most prominent of your acts. Your petty and local intrigues have been passed by unheeded. They evince, however, a heartless insincerity, under the effect of which many of your adherents have lamented... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
In your letter dated in the autumn of 1819, you say-“The Missouri question conceals, so far as he (Mr. King) is concerned, no plot, and we shall give it a true direction.” This expression, until otherwise shown, must be construed to mean, that Mr King, if returned to the United States Senate, would adhere to that policy of which he had avowed himself the advocate during the preceding session of... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Before I proceed to further details on the subject of your supporting Mr. King as the acknowledged leader of the opposition on the Missouri question, it may not be improper to notice the miserable subterfuge to which some of your friends (through your advice) may attempt to resort. It has been remarked, in the course of these letters, that on all great national measures, your policy, as far as... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
When the legislature adjourned in April, 1819, the federal newspapers were assailing Mr. Clinton and his friends, for not supporting Mr. Rufus King. The papers under your influence were making the most solemn declarations “that the republicans would not move to the right or to the left. They would support their candidate, and no other.” Thus far your plans had succeeded. On the 4th of March, 1819... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
My last letter left you advocating, in legislative caucus, the unanimous nomination of De Witt Clinton for the office of Governor. This caucus, it will be remembered, was held on the 27th of March, 1817. After his election in April you soon ascertained that you had not the confidence of, and would have but little or no influence with, the then dominant party. You were disappointed, and again... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Immediately after the determination of the late war, there was an organization of parties throughout the State. The federalists, as a separate and distinct body, no longer existed.— The popularity of Mr. Clinton seemed to be at an end. With the democracy of the State Mr. Tompkins was the idol. You, sir, like an incubus, had fastened yourself upon him. At no period of your life (and his real... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
It is believed that no candid man who peruses the preceding letters can view you in any other light during the year 1812, than as an opponent of the war and its friends; and as having “changed fronts” from mercenary and selfish considerations, after the election of Mr. Madison, and triumph of the war party. A more impudent and unsupported claim was never made by a political juggler, than that... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB

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