N New York State Library

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I write principally for the purpose of wishing you & Mrs. D. a happy new year. News I cannot give you. The Presidential question is about as unsettled as it ever was. Mr Crawfords health is re-established & his prospects far from desperate. The only certain thing, is that neither can be elected without one gives way. Who that will be we have now no means of knowing. Clay hangs back. If... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Mr Winne has written me on the subject of a consulship in S. America & having lost his address I am under the necessity of troubling you with the answer. Mr Adams called upon me this morng & told me that for most of the commercial places in that region Consuls had already been appointed, & that he could not answer the application unless Mr W. made a ^it^ specific, application in which... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Harmanus Bleecker
I beg leave to introduce to your notice my Son who is greatly bound to your kindness.
Sender/Author: Gideon Lee
Recipient: MVB
I hope that by this time John is with you. It is now a long time since he has ben troubled with a depression of spirits such as doubtless distressed him when at NHaven & to which he was formerly much inclined. I have no doubt however that when he gets engaged in his Studies he will be entirely free from it. I wish to constitute you his guardian & would prefer that he should attend divine... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Harry Croswell
I wish you and Ms Dudley a Merry Christmass. If there was any thing of interest here to communicate I would write it, but there is not. People as yet keep themselves, to themselves, and watch the movements of the water. The elements of a determined & ultimately furious opposition are on the spot & wait only for opportunity to be put in motion. If Mr Adams had been here enough to have... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I am sorry for the omission but there was enough <illegible> <illegible> ^to^ move without it. I did not receive your note until it was too late or I should have been with you. I have two accusations to make agt. you the one for neglecting to send me the corrected copy of the Speech & the other for taking the shine off of mine yesterday by making one forty times better & one... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: John Randolph
I was happy to be remembered by you and can assure you I was not less pleased with your letter than I was amused with the lines enclosed. I shall take great pleasure in delivering your message to Mrs. Dunn & Mrs. Gardinier the latter has been spending some time in Kington and I believe is still there. The story goes that a certain Senator’s attention last summer to a certain lady in Market... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Harriet Allen Butler
Recipient: MVB
I wish you would republish the Resolution submitted by Mr Bright in the Senate of Newyork appearing in the last Argus with the short editorial article in your paper of Monday
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Joseph Gales Jr. , Recipient: William Winston Seaton
I am a sorry fellow for not sooner acknowledging the obligations I really feel for your last letter. I assure you it gave me great pleasure. Nothing serves so well to season the perpetual gossip & perpetual dissipations of this Sodom as an occasional letter from a kind hearted & sensible female friend. Christina writes me occasionally & Mrs. Taylor commenced a correspondence with me... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Mr <illegible> has promised to deliver you a fair copy of the rough notes of my remarks on the <Mo> to adhere to the amendments of the Senate to the Judiciary Bill. I wish this immediately published in the Intelligencer instead of waiting on this order in the publication of that debate. My <illegible> are <illegible> that the <illegible> of the <illegible>... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Joseph Gales Jr. , Recipient: William Winston Seaton
I am ashamed of myself for my remissness in what was due to our friendship & am gratified to find that your goodness has suggested my apology. I have shewn your letter to Mr Ridgeley, it gave him great pleasure & he desired to be remembered to you. Our session closes in six days and we have yet every thing to do. The West Indian Bill was under consideration yesterday & we rejected by... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Harmanus Bleecker
I thank you sincerely for your very polite letter which was recd. in my absence. I am again on the point of leaving home for the <next> & have only time to express my great satisfaction that we think alike on the Presidential question & to assure you that from all accounts there is not the least reason to doubt our complete success. I shall always be happy to hear from you & to... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Robert Monell
I sent a message to you on the subject of the Surveyorship by Hoffman which I hope he has delivered & which I further hope has atoned for my negligence in not writing to you on the subject. It is thought by many of our friends that the present is the most auspicious moment to put an end to the diversities of opinion among Republicans on the subject of the Presidency by a firm but temperate... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
After the very liberal manner in which you spoke to me on the subject of the Clerkship before I left Albany, I have reason to hope that you will be satisfied with the enclosed. I have been much indispose[ed] since I have been here but am now better & intend to go to the Senate tomorrow. Remember me to my friends & believe me to be
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Philip Phelps
I have rcd yours & would answer it <at> <large> but must plead the pressure [o]f my engagements as an apology [f]or referring you to a letter [t]his day written to Mr Knower in answer to one from him on the same subject with yours. Accept my thanks for your friendly feelings & rest assured they are fully reciprocated
Sender/Author: MVB
     The object to be affected by your financial plan is so intimately connected with the public good & your zeal in its prosecution is praiseworthy that I cannot but regret that it is not in my power to approve the means it contemplates to employ. My situation here puts it out of my power to enter into a detail of the reasons which induce me to believe that the scheme you propose would... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I write you in much haste on the eve of my leaving Nashville, and enclosed a copy of the Genls letter to the Union, on the subject of Texas. It did not strike me at that time that the determination of any considerable portion of the democratic party had been formed to take advantage of your letter to Hammet and <will> draw upon your support in the convention. But after seeing Judge <... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I send you some rough sketches out of which you & Major Donelson will I hope be able to make some thing. They have been put off in the midst of company & are not worth much. You must put your wise heads together and make this part of the service as good at least as the rest is. I am so much pleased in anticipation of the effect likely to be produced by it that I must beg you to go it over... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I beg leave to introduce to your notice my young Friend, George A. Richmond, who visits W M Washington, with a view to <obtain> ^solicit^ a midshipmans Warrant. Mr. R. is of <illegible> of the best Families in Providence R.I. and is <moreover> a fine young man. Any <favor> you may find it in ^the <illegible> of^ your <illegible> to <show> him will be duly... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Gideon Lee
Recipient: MVB
I am gratified to perceive that you take so considerable an interest in the case of young O <Sullivan>. He is one of the <illegible> & worthiest youths I ever knew. Gov Dickerson is a very kind hearted man & will be very ready to all he can possible <to> promote the wishes of your correspondent. It is <illegible> most proper from the <relationship> in which I... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I am exceedingly desirous of procuring a pla Midshipmans place in the Navy for my Son. The lad now eighteen years ^is^ most firmly bent on being so placed, if the thing be possible. Alderman <Furniss> has kindly taken charge of the application. He is acquainted with the Boy. May I solicit your good offices in this matter which in which I feel unusual solicitude?
Sender/Author: Gideon Lee
Recipient: MVB
I t Permit me to introduce to your favorable nature, James Coppinger <Jnr>—recently from France whose communication any courtesies which you may by pleased to extend to <Jnr>—will be deemed by me as granted to myself
Sender/Author: Gideon Lee
Recipient: MVB
You know with what tenacity people hold on to office. I have no idea that Mr Vernon would resign & our application to him <illegible> ^would be^ unpleasant. I think Mr <illegible> ought to be appointed without reference to Mr Vernons <decision> & have no objection to your using my name to the Secretary of the Treasury to great effect.
Sender/Author: MVB
Mr Aaron Vail, a Clerk in the State Department, informs me that it is understood that you have accepted of the offer of the State Department, which it is said has been offered to you; and he requests that I should write to you in his favor. It has, according to my understanding, (been) an invariable maxim that a change of administration did not affect the subordinate officers of the Government,... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Too faint to read on microfilm.
Sender/Author: MVB
As the Executors of John Pruyn ^decd.^ or some of them, seem to trifle with me, respecting the Claim I have on the Estate. I wish you therefore Issue a writ agt. the Executors to wit John P. Beekman, Lucas J Van Alen ^& James VanDerpoel^ Exos. of the last Will &c & Codicile of Jno Bruyn decd. My demand is an a/c. of about $1000. I spoke to you some time Since respecting [. . .]... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB

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