DLC Library of Congress

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I recd. your favr. of the 22 Inst. enclosing the copy of the letter from Harrisburgh, with the necessary grains of allowance for the zeal of the author. It proves sufficient to satisfy every one of the soundness of Pennsylvania. Keyes arrived here on Saturday last & Flagg yesterday. Goodell is in town but I have not yet seen him. Keyes & Flagg are perfectly <orthodox> on all points... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Things are coming to points. Calhoun is on the eve of retiring in favour of Genl. Jackson. From a great variety of circusmtances I am well satisfied myself that if Nyork does not repeal the electoral law & supports the caucus which has been held by her recommendation Mr Clay will retire & his friends will support Mr Crawford. Calhoun retires because his friends know he cannot &... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I have red. your letter—for which I thank you & will notice its contents hereafter. For the present I wish to state to you a matter in which you may perhaps be of service to me. Letters from Albany this day received announce to me a desertion as unexpected as disgusting. When I first treated with Mr. Buel for the purchase of the Argus establishment I was induced to make it a point that Mr... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Gorham Akin Worth
I am so much pleased with your Legislative address that I send you the enclosed that you may see how it took in a foreign print. The Intelligencer is so crowded that it is not [pos]sible to get any thing in it but Speeches. You will see that Edwds has again attacked Mr Crawford. Our friends need not fear that he will suffer by any thing that his enemies can do agt. him. If ever there was a... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I send you Pickerings review. You will see that the violence of his political antipathies instead of yielding in the course of nature to the influence of time & retirement has increased with his years. I fear there is too much reason to believe, that his individual case furnishes ^a^ correct criterion, by which to test the temper of his party, & to estimate the probable consequences of... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Thomas Jefferson
When I had the pleasure of visiting Monticello, you enquired of me respecting Mr. Clintons agency in our internal improvements. From present appearances our State is likely to be once more (& I trust for the last time) to be severely agitated on his account & I am desirous that you should have a just view of the matter to which your enquiry related. The Supplement to the accompanying... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Thomas Jefferson
I have assertained that “Tom” a black man who you purchaised of <Fesburgh> & who quit you some 10 years since is now in the neighbourhood of Worcester Ms. There is yet some time before he is free as he is of that class which will be free July 4th 1827. He was when young a slave of my father and I think I can induce him to be of some service to me if own him. I therefore take the liberty... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Alonzo G. Hammond
Recipient: MVB
I owe you many apologies for seeming in attention to your constant kindness. The truth is I have had nothing agreeable or interesting to write. I did not apply to the Chancellor (Kent) as you desired, because I ascertained the day I recd. your letter that he had positively determined to take the course he has. He will see the day when he will regret it. Mr Crawford is substantially well. You... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Now, as heretofore, I will not suffer the warm current of my friendship for you to be checked by the character & kind of your associate#. If I can be of any service in the affair you allude to It will give me pleasure to be so; though I thereby necessarily serve the bitterest enemy I, probably, have in the world. The course is a petition to congress, setting forth the case with documents.... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Gorham Akin Worth
Your good husband occasionally (when asked) says that you make enquires about & kind friendly messages to us; but they are expressed so <friendly>, & so long between, that I am inclined to think that you have forgotten us poor congressmen. So far as the lower house is concerned, you are right, for it is getting to resemble a bear garden more than a deliberative assembly. But the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Make use of the information of contained in this letter if useful (to yourself it will be a guide) but do not mention names. Varplanck yesterday in presence of my wife said Well Adams is a Clintonian I have received a letter from Washington informing me that Adams was in favor of Spencer. That In this state the Contest was between Mr Clinton & Mr Van Buren & his friends from the latter he... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I do not know why I should not (following the example of one of our Ga newspapers in which it is always done) derange the letters of your name & make you neighbor to the great Bean, since you, (misled by such examples) take the liberty to stick an e to the end of my name. I have no e, to my name as I beg ^you^ to understand & remember, if you do not wish me to mangle your patronymic most... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: John Forsyth Sr.
Recipient: MVB
Your letter found me in my bed, from which, I assure you, I have risen with some difficulty. My exposure in the trial of a canal cause, in the lower part of the county, brought on a violent cold, accompanied with chills & fevers, and for the first time in six years, I had a violent bilious attack. I have happily survived it however, and hope now to live to fight an other day. We all regretted... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Louis McLane
Recipient: MVB
I have not been able sooner to make the communication, nor is the measure absolutely settled, that the mission to G. Britain has been offered to me, and that it is probable I may accept it. At present I mention the same to you without wishing to be quoted
Sender/Author: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I [rec]d. your letter at the moment of my departure for the Country where I have since been confined by indisposition from which I am ^have^ however entirely recovered. I had been previously advised of the offer of the mission to you though from a satisfactory though not an official source & am happy to hear that ^you have found^ no obstacle objection to its acceptance. When will you go. If... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I will be ready to go to Oswego on Saturday. You and Finkle therefore better come up on Saturday morning & we will start from here in the afternoon & go as far as Schenectady in the evening. Write me by mail when I may expect you & I will be ready. If any other day will suit better fix upon it but not longer than Monday.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Peter I. Hoes
Let me by this scrawl introduce to you my friend President Cooper of Cola. College. S.C. His name is enough. He has requested of me this favor on board the boat, and I have no implements of writing but these.
Sender/Author: Thomas Addis Emmet
Recipient: MVB
My friend Judge W. Smith to whom Col. Hayne succeeded in the Senate at Washington from South Carolina, & Dr. Brown of Kentucky, left New York yesterday, and promised to wait for me at Albany. I have sent to every house but Crittenden’s, without learning of them. As I know Judge Smith meant to call on you, I beg you wd. have the kindness to inform my Son the bearer of this, whether you know of... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Thomas Cooper
Recipient: MVB
I enclose you two papers, one respecting the interference of the Clergy with the duties of the legislature, which I mentd. to you, & the other, to paralyse the report of Mr Jefferson being a Tariff-politician & in favour of protecting duties. In theory, and in justice, all duties for protection, are in my mind utterly indefensible: for they are taxes on the consumers without any <... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Thomas Cooper
Recipient: MVB
I have concluded to make no arrangement on the Subject of Quarters until I arrive in Washington. I have had conversations with Forsyth & McLane on the Subject & must see them before I determine. Those two Gentlemen, (or the former only if the latter takes his wife down) VerPlank yourself & myself would make an excellent mess. Write to the <Frenchman>. Take care of the Election... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Enclosed you will find a letter addressed to yourself about my brother William, for whom I am anxious to obtain orders for Entering into the service. It is such a letter as I supposed you might with propriety transmit (as you suggested) to the Secretary of the Navy. I regret that I was out of town when you called at my house, but was pleased to learn that there would be no difficulty about my... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Edward Livingston
Recipient: MVB
I shall attend to your brothers concern. Mr. J. forgets what is due to the subject, to his friends & to myself. I can conscientiously say that I never have, and I <illegible> I never shall subject my course on a public question to the controul of my personal interests. I shall always listen with respect and <candor> to Any suggestion which may be made <to me> on the subject... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Edward Livingston
I have to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from you. The period has not yet arrived here for interesting political events but is rapidly approaching. Genl Root has made us a visit, talks very well and does not appear to have any wants to be gratified, I mean political wants. He is in favour of Young for speaker & Livingston for Clerk, does not think it expedient to vacate the Seat of the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: William Learned Marcy
Recipient: MVB
I have heard with the most lively satisfaction the of the course taken by you in the Senate in relation to the nomination of my friend Conkling. It was earnest it was kind & magnanimous. I have advised Conkling of it. Your generous conduct is entitled to the warmest gratification of him and his Friends. It will I trust be remembered and duly appreciated by them, but ^by them^ now with the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Jabez Delano Hammond
Recipient: MVB
I wish you & your family not forgetting my frsweet heart Miss Margaret a very merry Christmass. Here the day is dark & raining & except the promise of some pleasure at dinner with Mr & Mrs. McLane nature & every thing else appears to be out of sorts. Nothing has transpired of much interest in the political world. The Jackson men being in the field are of course looking out for... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I am as you supposed somewhat surprised to hear that you went direct to Greenbush. I wrote you advising you to go to Kinderhook & to visit Albany from thence. I know the kindness which induces Mr & Mrs. Duer to wish to have you at their house, & approve your taste for <being> pleased with the good society you meet there, but I fear your Kinderhook friends will think themselves... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: John Van Buren

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