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Your letter of the 21st. has just reached me. The President has been about for the last week, returned only yesterday, very little as yet has been said relative to filling the vacancy on the bench of the Supreme Court. It rests entirely with myself whether I will take it or not it has been offered to me in a manner highly gratifying to my feelings. And I have no doubt with a sincere wish to save... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Your letter found me here, and has detained me until this time. The reasons you give for declining the appointment of Judge are certainly impressive, and as a prominent one is the state of your health, no one can so well appreciate them as yourself. Still it is my decided opinion, that in comparison with your present station the Judgeship is under all circumstances the most desirable, and I... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I subjoin copies of letters, that I have sent to Washington on the subject which they explain. And with sincere Regards & Esteem
Sender/Author: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I forward the enclosed copies in order that you may fully understand what I have said. If there be no want of Sagacity in the reader, he has understood the object of the first letter, on revising the second, as I copied it, I am confirmed in the Opinion that the Pr ought, as I think he will, adopt the advice which it imparts. Should this take place, I claim of you to make Marshal's example your... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I submitted to the President confidentially your letter. He informed me, no appointment would be made in some time, as it could not now be made in season for the Spring Circuits there was no necessity for acting at present. He said nothing from which I could gather his intentions in relation to the appointment. I think he is quite undecided, and means to take due time for consideration. Any... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The above is a copy of a letter recd. this Evening, that to which it is a Reply, is known to you by a copy, which I sent to you some days ago. I ought if the posts are regular, to have recd. your's acknowledging the receit of mine. I do not comprehend why your letter to [intentionally blank], which as I supposed went by the same mail with mine of the 1st. instant, had not been received and... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I have no farther suggestions to make on the matter of your last. The question is with the President & he will make such disposition of it as to him seems meet & proper. If it is supposed that I will enter into active competition with the numerous candidates who have and will continue to spring up for the place the supposition is founded in a mistake of my character. I confess to you (... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I do not perceive that any thing further can be done on your part, if you could do, what I do not believe you can, if you could infuse something of vigour in addition to the honest views of the S. of the N. it would impart to him a qualification that would be generally of service, and on the present occasion is of much consequence. I cannot but believe, that you will look with your usual... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
On my return from Norfolk a few days since I found your letter of the 15th. Inst. in which you inquire whether I have definitively declined the appointment of a Judge of the Supreme Court, U.S. and whether the President so understands it. In my conversations with the President on the subject I certainly meant to be understood by him that I did decline taking the office. I am not certain that I... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
On the 25th. I received the letter, copy of which I subjoin viz.  By referring to the letter from me to M.A. you will discover the nature, and Extent, or the opinion in wh. we agree. I have not made any reply to the last letter; & am not a little embarrased, by the caucus proceedings <i> at Albany in deciding whether I ought to make a Reply, and if I should conclude to do so, what the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I thank you for the Resolution. It is conclusive of the temper of the legislature as to Adams but will give hopes to Clay. That gentleman as he passed thro: this City was asked, Will you be a Candidate for the Speaker's Chair? No, But if the House should Elect me, I will Accept. "Noli Episcopari." He is of Course a Candidate, and if he succeeds, will have a power which will Enable him to make... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Samuel Smith
Recipient: MVB
I didnot till yesterday receive the resolutions of the Republican Members of the Legislature of New York, for which accept my sincere thanks; Their plan of a national caucus, to nominate a candidate for the next president, is certainly preferable, to that of state nominations; The only ^objection^ to which, is that it produces so much electioneering among the members of Congress, that it seems to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Accept my thanks for your civility, in sending me the proceedings of the republican meeting at albany; but I am so much engaged on a farm, and so little learned in the grand affair of making presidents, as not to be able to understand their future consequences or present bearing. Besides, I employ the time I can spare, in writing a last speech [in] the shape of a last book, to be printed by the... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
^From what^ Mr Butler tells me ^it appears^ that some good friend has informed you that I had denied you the credit of Beardsleys appointment The fact <we> there ^attempted to make mischief between us & it is proper that I should prevent^. Mr Tracy told me that you was in favour of Mr Concklin's appointment, in preference to Lynch or Buel and from the positive manner in which he spoke... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
I have received your letter of the 16th. making very kind and friendly inquires respecting my health. I was a little unwell for a few days soon after my return from Norfolk, but have entirely recovered. It is very uncertain whether I shall go to the north this summer. It will depend entirely upon the state of the health of Washington. I should be very happy to have the interview you mention. But... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I am very sorry you have received and treated so gravely and seriously what I mentioned to Mr Butler respecting the appointment of Beardsley I did not consider it a matter of much consequence or I should have written you on the subject, and not barely have sent a verbal message. Your explanation is perfectly satisfactory. There is however a mistake, about my ever having expressed a decided... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I was very much astonished at the information contained in your letter of the 4th. as to certain speeches attributed to me in relation to yourself. I should have contented myself with a base denial of the truth of them, had you not mentioned that you had thought proper to institute a full inquiry into the matter, and that the result had left no doubt that Mr Governieur had reported what you... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Nothing has as yet been definitively decided upon, relative to filling the vacancy on the Bench of the Supreme Court. My present object is to inquire of you, whether after what has passed between you and myself on the subject, you think I could with propriety, as it respects yourself take the office... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Your letter with that of Mr Ulshoeffer was recd. by due course of mail. I had previously received the same account of the getting up of the Patriot, and a copy of the conditions, or articles to which he had verbally agreed, before his endorsement. His course might break him down, if there is as much intelligence and virtue among the people as I presume there is.      Well! Mr. Thompson is at last... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Considerations of duty to myself, as well as a desire to be perfectly frank with you, lead me to write this letter; and I hope that you will, on your part be equally frank towards me. Since the period of my removal from the State of Newyork, I have supposed that there existed not only a good understanding, but a mutual friendship between us. That we have constantly been, my feelings I can... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
On my return from the springs on a visit of two weeks I found your letter of the 1st. & hasten to reply to it. The efforts which have been made for the last six months to create ^to^ excitement on you part ^agt me^ have doubtless been made with ^proceeded from^ sinister views ^motives^ & ^been made^ with an eye to the Presidential election. In I think ^think I^ could name the man in your... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Your letter of the 15th in answer to mine of the 1st instant, was received last evening. The first intimation I had of your being unfriendly to me came to a friend of mine from a person who is unfriendly to me, and was predicated upon a conversation said to have taken place in the Senate Chamber last winter. To this I paid no attention. The next information was communicated to a friend of mine... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Little did I dream when I left Albany, latter end of July, that I should have been here, Where I am, latter end of Septem! but dreaming or waking so it is! the first near three weeks, I was quite sick at Tappan, Balls. of the time I have passed at the New Jersey Watering places, at Baltimore & in Philadelpgia, much of it in the company of Ladies, One I have been particularly Attentive to,... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Your [kin]d letter of the 13th [in]st. was duly recvd. And I assure you it afforded me a deal of pleasure, inasmuch as it served to shew that your friendship for me, which I highly prize was in no way diminished on account of the difference of opinion we entertained respecting the presidential question. This difference of opinion is not however so great as you may imagine, and which may have... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Yours of the 3d was not recd. until the 10th inst. and aiding to the bad regulation of the mails to this place, my letter will probably not reach you until the 18th or 20th: and you will be in possession of all the returns before that time. A federalist of the ald school is elected in Franklin. Mr. Winslow, a rep. is elected in St. Lawrence, unpledged. Maj. Linch, a rep. is elected without... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Azariah Cutting Flagg
Recipient: MVB
Two measures seem now to engross the attention of all political men in this state at this time viz. The nomination at Washington and the election of the presidential electors by the people. About the latter I think there is no difference of opinion among the enlightend republicans. If they could have it as they wish they would not change the existing mode but some timid men who wish well to the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: William Learned Marcy
Recipient: MVB

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