Albany (N.Y.) Argus

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In submitting for your approbation and support, the designation contained in the proceedings of a meeting of the Republican Delegation from the Middle District, herewith published, we take the liberty of addressing a word to you on the important subject to which it relates. In doing so, it can scarcely be necessary to state to you, that the right exercised by us on the present occasion, is... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB, Sender/Author: Erastus Root
for the albany argus. TO AMICUS CURIÆ. Your defence of the chancellor furnishes better proof of your friendship than of your discretion. Before you undertook the Herculean task, of supporting the extravagant grounds which his honor has thought proper to assume, common sense should have dictated a more critical and extensive "view of the whole ground." The omission to do so, has involved your... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: James Kent
for the argus. AMICUS-JURIS CONSULTUS—No. II. TO AMICUS CURIÆ. THE pledge with which I concluded my first number is before the public, and I proceed to its redemption. In the discharge of this duty I disclaim all personal feelings. The vindication of the constituted authorities of the state, being my only object, I can have no interests distinct from those of truth and justice.—Reposing myself on... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: James Kent
A CARD. Amicus-Juris Consultus having observed, that he is charged by the chancellor, in the Gazette of Thursday last, with an attempt "to tear asunder the bands of friendship" which has so long subsisted between him and the chief justice, deems it proper briefly to notice the unfounded imputation. The facts alledged by him were directly connected with the subject of his animadversions, viz. the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: James Kent
SPEECH OF MARTIN VAN BUREN, at the Albany county meeting, held at the capitol, of which gen. Stephen Van Rensselaer was chairman, and judge Buel secretary, for the appointment of delegates to the state convention. MR VAN BUREN said, that it had not been without difficulty that he had been able to satisfy himself of the propriety of his participating in the proceedings of the meeting. The object... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
The committee appointed by one of the foregoing resolutions to prepare and present a memorial to congress, having withdrawn for the purpose of agreeing to the same, again appeared in the meeting—when the following was reported on their behalf by Mr. Duer, and unanimously adopted. To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives in Congress assembled. The memorial of the inhabitants of the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB, Sender/Author: Charles Edward Dudley, Sender/Author: Ambrose Spencer, Sender/Author: Benjamin Knower, Sender/Author: Stephen Van Rensselaer III
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, requesting information concerning the manner in which the right of suffrage is regulated in New-York, together with my opinion upon the utility and practical operation of the system now in force there. I can have no objection whatever to furnish the information you desire, but I feel some delicacy, under the circumstances of the case, in... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
The approach of our regular election of a Governor and Lieutenant Governor and the established usages of the Republican Party, have again brought together the delegates of your choice, to discharge the important and responsible duty of selecting and presenting to the public suitable candidates for those high offices. This duty upon ordinary occasions delicate and difficult, has been to the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB, Sender/Author: John Sudam, Sender/Author: Alonzo G. Hammond, Sender/Author: James I. Roosevelt Jr.
I have received the resolution of the senate, appointing me a senator to represent the state in the senate of the congress of the United States, after the third of March next, and have to ask permission to communicate to the senate, through you, my acceptance of the office. Relying on the indulgence of the senate, and in justice to my own feelings, I avail myself of the opportunity thus presented... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Nathaniel Pitcher
I have been requested by a committee of the “New-York Law Institute” to lay the accompanying papers before the legislature. The Chancellor’s reply fully confirms the impression, which is, I believe, universal with the profession, that the relief prayed for is indispensable to the due administration of justice. Allow me, therefore, to recommend the subject to your early and favorable consideration...
Sender/Author: MVB
We beg leave to hand you the correspondence which has just passed between us, as a committee of the New-York Law Institute, and the Chancellor of the state, on a subject of great importance, especially to those who may be suitors in the court of chancery, residing in the city of New York. If your excellency should look upon it in that light, or deem it entitled to such consideration, we have to... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: George Washington Strong, Sender/Author: James I. Roosevelt Jr., Sender/Author: W.T. McCoun, Sender/Author: R. Sedgwick, Sender/Author: George F. Talman
Recipient: MVB
In my communication to the legislature at the opening of the session, I alluded briefly to the outlines of a plan suggested to me relative to the renewed bank charters. Understanding that it was the general expectation that a full development of its details would be laid before you by me, I have requested its author to furnish me with a more ample statement of his views: and have now the honor to... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
We have recently been appointed a committee of the New York law institute, which is composed of all the principal members of the bar of this city, to take such steps as may be thought necessary towards procuring the passage of a law for the appointment of a vice-chancellor to reside here. We have it in contemplation to present the subject to his excellency the governor, as we deem it a matter of... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: George Washington Strong, Sender/Author: James I. Roosevelt Jr., Sender/Author: W.T. McCoun, Sender/Author: R. Sedgwick, Sender/Author: George F. Talman
I have received yours of the 18th instant on the subject of a vice chancellor in the first circuit. Taking into consideration the present common law duties of the circuit judge, and the additional duty of hearing appeals from the surrogates in all cases of contested wills, both of real and personal estate, I am satisfied no individual can discharge those duties, and have any leisure to do the... Continue Reading
Recipient: George Washington Strong , Recipient: James I. Roosevelt Jr. , Recipient: W.T. McCoun , Recipient: R. Sedgwick , Recipient: George F. Talman
NOTICE ☞A meeting of the inhabitants of this city and county of Albany, is hereby requested at the capitol in the city of Albany, this evening, at six o'clock, for the purpose of expressing their opinions on the expediency of prohibiting the further extension of slavery in the United States.
Sender/Author: MVB, Sender/Author: Charles Edward Dudley, Sender/Author: John Townsend, Sender/Author: Ambrose Spencer, Sender/Author: Benjamin Knower, Sender/Author: Stephen Van Rensselaer III
At a meeting of the inhabitants of the city and county of Albany, held at the capitol, in the city of Albany, on Tuesday the 21st of December, 1819, in pursuance of public notice, to express their opinions upon the subject of extending slavery into the territories of the United States westward of the river Mississippi—the hon. John Taylor, was called to the chair, and Teunis Van Vechten, Esq.... Continue Reading
The Republican Members of the Legislature, at the close of the last session, announced to you their conviction, that the prosperity of the republican party, and the welfare of the state, required a change of the chief magistrate. Subsequent events have proved the correctness of this opinion, and enforced the expediency of this measure. While a doubt existed that Governor Clinton had abandoned the... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
It is not to the arbitrary mandates of despotic power, that your submission is demanded; it is not to the seductive wiles and artful blandishments of the corrupt minions of aristocracy, that your attention is called—but to an expression and discussion of the wishes and feelings of your representatives. You are invited to listen with calmness and impartiality, to the sentiments and opinions of men... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB, Sender/Author: Erastus Root
At a time when our country is engaged in war with one of the most powerful nations on earth, in defence of our national rights and sovereignty; when opposition has reared her hydra form, and put at defiance the constituted authorities; when treason walks forth at noon-day, and, under the specious garb of patriotism, sounds the tocsin of alarm, and invites you to marshal yourselves under her... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB, Sender/Author: Erastus Root, Sender/Author: Perley Keyes, Sender/Author: William Christian Bouck, Sender/Author: Samuel Young
Republican General Meeting. At a very numerous and respectable Meeting of Republican Citizens of Albany, and from different parts of the State, held at the Capitol, on the 14th day of April, 1814, Col. DANIEL WARNER, of Columbia, in the Chair, P. G. CHILDS, Esq. of Madison, Sec'ry. The following preamble and resolution having been read— Mr. Van Buren rose and addressed the meeting in a handsome... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
PURSUANT to an intimation in my last, I now solicit your attention to the act entitled "An act to authorize the raising of troops for the defence of this state," and your objections to the same. To the passage of this bill you have interposed five objections; several of which appear to me to contain very extraordinary principles. I will not say, sir, that your objections to this bill are... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Samuel Young
Recipient: James Kent
Believing that your attention, for the time being, must have been sufficiently occupied with the numbers of Amicus Juris Consultus, and unwilling to distract it with a multiplicity of objects, I have delayed for some time to address you. I have waited till the subject of privateering is nearly exhausted. A repetition of my former observations on this subject, would be useless, and shall be... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Samuel Young
Recipient: James Kent
Mr. Paine moved the following resolutions, in behalf of the committee appointed on the subject, which were ordered to be printed. Resolved unanimously, as a sense of this legislature that Major General ANDREW JACKSON, and the gallant officers and soldiers under his command, for their noble defence of the city of New-Orleans, that important military post and grand emporium of commerce, especially... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: New York Legislature
Mr. Monroe having just been appointed secretary of war, it is necessary to provide for the vacancy resulting in the department of state. Wishing to avail the U. States of your talents and services, I take the liberty of requesting permission to name you to the senate, as his successor. I am aware of the very important station from which their concurrence will withdraw you; but I justify my... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: James Madison
Your letter of the 28th of September, was received by me last evening. I have reflected, in the short interval, upon the course which duty to my family and to my country, required me to pursue in relation to your obliging offer, and have concluded to decline the acceptance of the department of state. A variety of public and private considerations, have produced this determination. These... Continue Reading
Recipient: James Madison
Upon a view of the whole ground, I was convinced that I should act more consistent with my own and the happiness of my family, that I could give more important and efficient aid to your administration, and render more essential service to my country, by remaining in my present station, than by accepting the department of state. With the duties of the former, I am familier; to those of the latter... Continue Reading
Recipient: James Madison

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