Series 5 (1 January 1825-3 March 1829)

U.S. Senate (Jan. 1825-3 March 1829): Reconciliation with DeWitt Clinton, support for Andrew Jackson, formation of Jacksonian Democratic coalition, election of 1828, gubernatorial tenure.

Displaying 121 - 135 of 660
It has been usual through the whole course of the Government, to place one Department temporarily under the superintendence of the head of another. That may, and will probably, have to be done in this case. The only difficulty may be, that the personal relations between Mr. Clay and the gentlemen whom you will select for your Cabinet, may be such as to lose the advantage of those explanations... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Andrew Jackson
This will be handed to you by Mr Townsend of the City of New York a gentleman of science & much private worth. I take the liberty of introducing him to your favourable consideration.
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Andrew Jackson
I received last night, from the deputy Secretary of State, a commission appointing me special attorney under the "act to provide for the employment of counsel for the purposes therein mentioned". In accepting this appointment, I beg leave to say, that it is done with some reluctance and at much personal inconvenience; and that I am chiefly induced to undertake its duties, from my knowledge of the... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
The enclosed letter came to me open, of course I am cognizant of the contents. I presume you have correspondents <here> yo who give you the little rumors which circulate. I send you a set of Resolutions, which I mean to support some day in a sort of a Speech. This subject of In. Imp. must be regulated, and upon the basis of justice to all the states. It is not in nature that one set of... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I congratulate you on the delivery of your maiden message, to the Legislature. I have read it with attention, and am much pleased with its matter and style, and equally so with its frankness, and independence of character. I think it must prove very acceptable to the great body of your Constituents. Allow me to add my hearty wishes that your administration, thus happily begun, may be... Continue Reading
Sender: Robert Troup
Recipient: MVB
Allow me to introduce to you my friend & successor Mr Dudley, who you will find to deserve your estee[m] & confidence, as well personally as politically. He knows your reputation & of course favourably. I was greatly disappointed in not seeing you at Nyork. I went to where you had been (<illegible> a storm) but found that you was there no longer. Remember me kindly to Mrs... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Levi Woodbury
I thank you a thousand times for your kind remembrance of me & am ashamed of myself for not having sooner acknowledged it. But if you could have the slightest conception of the variety and multiplicity of my concerns you would I am sure ^pardon^ my seeming negligence. I assure you with great sincerity that I would greatly prefer to spend my winter with your agreeable mess to the hustle &... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I cannot approve of the bill entitled an act “to allow Rebecca Albro, the wife of Wait Albro, of the town of Beekman, in Dutchess co, to receive certain legacies left her by her grandfather,” and do therefore return the same to the assembly with these my objections. The petition upon which this bill is founded, sets forth that the petitioner was deserted by her husband, in the month of August... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
By conversation with intelligent and well-informed persons on this particular subject, and by extensive reading, I have become so imbued with some of the leading principles which I believe ought to govern the Legislature in deciding upon the serious question as to the renewal of the charters of the banks of the State, that I cannot forbear writing to you on the subject, even in a hasty and... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
At the commencement of the session of Congress when the election was made by the House of Representatives (1825) Mr. Clay told Mr. Forsyth and myself at a dinner given by the Russian Minister, that if we could understand what Mr. Webster meant to do we could do more than he, and used several expressions indicating dislike and great want of confidence. Dec. 30th 1826. Mr. Buchanan of Penn. Told me... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
As the accompanying report may not have reached you I take the liberty of transmitting it. You will observe the lame attempt of the committee to make out that Genl. Washington was in favour of the power. The result of their labours must be a contrary impression; for however difficult it may be to discriminate between this question and that of the Bank originally, still the deep interest he... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
At the commencement of the session of Congress when the election was made by the house Mr Clay told me in the presence of F. that if we could understand what W. meant we could do more than he could & used several expressions indicating great want of confidence <illegible> & dislike. Dec 30th 1826. Mr B. of P. told me that at the same session when the Bill making appropriation for... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I shall be with you in the course of an hour or two in the mean time let me know whether you can do me the favor to take your dinner with me at 4 to day or any other hour that will be more agreeable to you
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Nicholas Biddle
What I write to you is so far only confidential that you may in your best discretion communicate it to some of our friends as you think necessary. Mr Wright will soon be with you as well as <Keyes> & <Earl>. From them & our immediate friends in Albany, Knower Marcy & Croswell you know I have no secrets. The strong imposition previously made on the mind of Mr Adams &... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I enclose the letter you desired. You will observe that I have confined the extract to the immediate subject before you. It appears to me that it would be unwise now to promulgate the strictures on the conduct of Virginia &c but even if this were not the case that it would be especially impolitic that you should be the publisher of such charges. Whether correct or not the People are ignorant... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB

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