Series 5 (1 January 1825-3 March 1829)

U.S. Senate (Jan. 1825-3 March 1829): Reconciliation with DeWitt Clinton, support for Andrew Jackson, formation of Jacksonian Democratic coalition, election of 1828, gubernatorial tenure.

Displaying 106 - 120 of 660
Too faint to read on microfilm.
Recipient: MVB
I have received the resolution of the senate, appointing me a senator to represent the state in the senate of the congress of the United States, after the third of March next, and have to ask permission to communicate to the senate, through you, my acceptance of the office. Relying on the indulgence of the senate, and in justice to my own feelings, I avail myself of the opportunity thus presented... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Mr Aaron Vail, a Clerk in the State Department, informs me that it is understood that you have accepted of the offer of the State Department, which it is said has been offered to you; and he requests that I should write to you in his favor. It has, according to my understanding, (been) an invariable maxim that a change of administration did not affect the subordinate officers of the Government,... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Your questions are of great delicacy & I shall confidently expect that what I say in reply to them shall be known to but one person besides yourself. It is of vital importance to have a decided majority in the quarter to which you allude, but it is not under the circumstances many ^as^ material how large that majority is. It will be constantly gaining & with good treatment may be made... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: John Henry Eaton
The several letters which I have written to the President through you explain most things of which I would other ^wise^ speak in this. Any mode in which you may think the business of the Department can be best attended to, whether that which is stated in your letter of the 25th, or the one suggested to by me will be alike agreeable. I have recevd a letter from Mr Verplanck to day in which he... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I wish you would hand the enclosed to Major Eaton. It is quite confidential & I wish you to say to him that contrary to my nature I have sent it in the hand writing of my son, from a consciousness of his ^(Mr Es)^ habitual carelessness about his letters; and an apprehension that it might (as heretofore in other cases) find its way into one of the Committee rooms folded up in a petition for in... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Enclosed you have a letter from Major Eaton to me & a copy of my reply. enclosed. You will judge by the condition of things when they arrive whether it will be best to deliver the letter or not. If the Cabinet arrangements are made when my letters is are received it will for many reasons be desirable that my inattention to the Majors letter should be attributed to the same cause with his... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I enclose you a letter to the General, which explains all that I would otherwise write. You will exercise your discretion as to delivering it open or sealed. If the arrangement I propose succeeds, or, whether it does or not, there cannot be a doubt of our ability to serve you in proportion to our desires. I have no time to add another word. I hope Eaton has shown you my letter to him. I had not... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
When do you go to Washington. I have a letter from my friend Major Hamilton which I should like to send to you if there is time. Let me know by return of mail. Poor Butler lost his election through the abandonment of him by a large portion of your Delegation at the last moment. He expected to get them all but Mr <illegible> who openly & honestly went for Bronson from the beginning.
Sender: MVB
I have looked for the "continuation" with a degree of impatience that has prevented me from discharging a duty imposed as well by the laws of gallantry as gratitude, that is to make my warmest acknowledgments for your kind favour. If I could deceive myself so much as to believe that I am entitled to half the compliments, which with characteristic delicacy you pay me, it would give me more... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
It is impossible to judge correctly without a view of the whole ground. Some two or three weeks before the meeting of the Legislature, Sudam by letter requested my neutrality. I shewed it to Mr. Butler, and, with his approbation, replied, that I would consider it my duty, under all circumstances, not to interfere. Bronson's friends had the address to push Dudley into the Senate, and MARCY WAS SO... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
I am distressed by Lorenzo's accounts of your affairs in New York. When will the Republican Party be made sensible of the indispensable necessity of nominating none but true and tried men, so that when they succeed they gain something? The same game that is playing with you was in a degree played here on the nomination of Attorney General. The only personal objection that was made to Mr. Butler,... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
You know with what tenacity people hold on to office. I have no idea that Mr Vernon would resign & our application to him <illegible> ^would be^ unpleasant. I think Mr <illegible> ought to be appointed without reference to Mr Vernons <decision> & have no objection to your using my name to the Secretary of the Treasury to great effect.
Sender: MVB
Do me the favor to hand or send the enclosed to our mutual & interesting friend. I cannot in any event leave here before about the 15th of March. I should have expected to hear from you but for the reasons you assign. I hope & believe our anxious friend will be gratified. If he is not it will not be my fault. Let me hear from you two or three times & as fully as you can before you... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Allow me to urge you not to f[o]rget the subject of the use of money at elections. Nothing can be more important to the preservation of our <instution> <illegible> ^or^ the success of our party.
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Charles Stebbins

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