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Immediately after the determination of the late war, there was an organization of parties throughout the State. The federalists, as a separate and distinct body, no longer existed.— The popularity of Mr. Clinton seemed to be at an end. With the democracy of the State Mr. Tompkins was the idol. You... Continue Reading
I learn with the keenest regret from your letter, this moment received, that there is in your opinion good reason to apprehend that the feelings of portions of my friends have been so deeply wounded by some of the proceedings at Baltimore, as to induce them to withhold their support from the... Continue Reading
I wish you and Ms Dudley a Merry Christmass. If there was any thing of interest here to communicate I would write it, but there is not. People as yet keep themselves, to themselves, and watch the movements of the water. The elements of a determined & ultimately furious opposition are on the... Continue Reading
During the year 1812, and for sometime previous, you was a resident of Hudson. Mr. James A. Hamilton was also a resident of the same place.- Congenial spirits, an intimacy was formed, which has ripened into a most affectionate and tender friendship. The ties which now bind you together are... Continue Reading
I have now briefly reviewed your political career, from 1812 to 1820 inclusive. During this period you was a member of the state Senate. It will be observed, that reference has only been made to the most prominent of your acts. Your petty and local intrigues have been passed by unheeded. They... Continue Reading
It is believed that no candid man who peruses the preceding letters can view you in any other light during the year 1812, than as an opponent of the war and its friends; and as having “changed fronts” from mercenary and selfish considerations, after the election of Mr. Madison, and triumph of the... Continue Reading
I left Washington on the 7th instant intending to go directly to Lexington Kentucky, but the dreadful pestilence which has desolated that City, and which pervades many parts of the State, has caused me to remain a short time in this City which I leave in the morning for Lexington, the health of the... Continue Reading
I am charged with the presentation of the enclosed application. And altho' no expectation is entertained of any action in the matter, at the present session, yet may I hope Sir, that the practice of converting any part of this Capitol into a retail shop, of ardent spirits will be, hereafter,... Continue Reading
I have now been here several days and have seen persons from almost every part of the state, and have no doubt, that our success is as certain as any future event, that is dependent upon the voice of the people, can possibly be. The adversary is suffering under the pangs of anticipated defeat, ... Continue Reading
It has already been remarked, that on the 3d of November, 1812, the legislature convened for the purpose of appointing presidential electors. In the evening of the 4th a caucus of the democratic members was held in the Senate chamber, to nominate candidates. A preliminary discussion ensued. The... Continue Reading
Your letter of the 24th was handed me by Mr. Cambreleng at the moment of stepping into the carriage to visit the Town of Brooklyn upon the invitation of its trustees, and I embrace the first moment of my return to reply to it. You have done all that was required of you in regard to the suggestions... Continue Reading

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