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Under the belief that it is the right of every free Citizen in a free government, to know the opinions of those who aspire to public Station, upon great public questions, as one of your warmest supporters in 1836 & in 1840, & as an unpledged Delegate to the Baltimore Convention, I desire... Continue Reading
I have recd your letter of the 9th It is creditable to the nation the general disgust & excration that the dastardly & cowardly insult offered me by the late disgraced, & degraded Lt. Randolph, and it is equally creditable to the public presses, that so much unanimity on this event,... Continue Reading
In your letter dated in the autumn of 1819, you say-“The Missouri question conceals, so far as he (Mr. King) is concerned, no plot, and we shall give it a true direction.” This expression, until otherwise shown, must be construed to mean, that Mr King, if returned to the United States Senate, would... Continue Reading
I have had the honor to receive by the hands of Mr Gansevoort Melville your communication requesting me in behalf of a Convention of Delegates from the several wards of the City and County of New York, to preside at a mass meeting of the democracy, to be held on the 4th inst., to respond to the... Continue Reading
I write principally for the purpose of wishing you & Mrs. D. a happy new year. News I cannot give you. The Presidential question is about as unsettled as it ever was. Mr Crawfords health is re-established & his prospects far from desperate. The only certain thing, is that neither can be... Continue Reading
I wrote you a long letter the other day but burnt it in consequence of its having been delayed but one day and that short period having worked an almost entire revolution in the State of things here. At present our affairs are situated thus. Clay & his friends have settled down for Adams. This... Continue Reading
I am much obliged by your letter and perhaps the more so because I do not feel that I entirely deserved it. For I ought to have written to you long ago—and have been constantly intending to do so. But in one way or another my time has been constantly filled up. Yet I wanted much to hear from you... Continue Reading
I left Washington on the 7th instant intending to go directly to Lexington Kentucky, but the dreadful pestilence which has desolated that City, and which pervades many parts of the State, has caused me to remain a short time in this City which I leave in the morning for Lexington, the health of the... Continue Reading
I write now to notice sundry things which I have overlooked and omitted to answer in your <illegible> letters, as well as to give the <present> reasons, and to say a few words upon another subject. The King to whom I refered as one my advisers here at present was Preston King and not... Continue Reading
I learn with the keenest regret from your letter, this moment received, that there is in your opinion good reason to apprehend that the feelings of portions of my friends have been so deeply wounded by some of the proceedings at Baltimore, as to induce them to withhold their support from the... Continue Reading
I must beg Your excuse for so long delaying to acknowledge the receipt of your last Letter, and its accompanyment, which is owing to my having been absent for home since Friday afternoon, when not hearing from You, I paid a visit to a friend in the country, in hopes of recovering from an affection... Continue Reading
You <stick> to me in the way of expense at least. The enclosed after travelling the rounds have hit me instead of you. I have spent a very pleasant time here & leave this morg for Geneva. We had a large & <monied> party at Mr <Greig's> yesterday & things passed off... Continue Reading
The manner in which the bill to raise twelve thousand men, originated in 1814, has been detailed. It was a measure recommended by Gov. Tompkins; and as the bill reported by Mr. Van Buren, differed from that reported by Gen. Root, it is proper to examine in what the difference consisted. The... Continue Reading
Your letter of the 27th was handed to me by your son at sun-set on last evening. My letter to you of the 1st will inform you of what has been done. If I have committed an error, I can only say it was unintentional. It pains me to think that you may suppose that I have acted unkindly towards... Continue Reading
I have spent some time in Nyork but on a closer view of the whole ground did not find our friends as fully sensible of their actual condition as I thought they were and as I am persuaded they will be in a short time. To have moved in the business now might have created a new schism in the party... Continue Reading
In preceding letters it has been demonstrated that from 1811 to 1813, you were the advocate and supporter of that class of politicians who were opposed to the war; that you were the untiring opponent of James Madison, and the devoted adherent of De Witt Clinton. And here let me again remark that it... Continue Reading
It is I presume quite unnecessary that I should say that the insult offered to you by Randolph has excited the utmost abhorrence here. With but one infamous exception the press has as far as my observation extends, spoken upon the subject in terms of unqualified reprobation. In this, as in all... Continue Reading
I recd. your letter last Eveng whilst on the wing for this place. In that spirit of entire candour which has hitherto ^& ever shall^ distinguished, ^& ever shall^ our intercourse I must say to you that it has caused me not a considerable embarrassment, and not a little pain. If any honest... Continue Reading
Mrs V.S. is here & has had several interviews with Dickerson. I spoke to him to exert his official authority if practicable & prevent the intended duello. He has every desire to prevent mischief & will endeavour to do so. The meeting is fixed for Monday or Wendy next in this Dist.... Continue Reading
I must throw myself on your indulgence, and beg you to wait with me for a settlement of my dues to you until some period in August, when I shall be able to ascertain the value of the growing cotton crop, and gather what other convertible means may be within my control at that time. At that period I... Continue Reading

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