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The Senate having resumed the consideration of the bill “to abolish imprisonment for debt,” The first part of the first section of the bill being as follows:-“That no bail or security for the appearance of any defendant or defendants shall hereafter be required upon the service of the original, or... Continue Reading
The bill for the relief of Thomas L. Ogden, and others, was again taken up, and, after some further debate, in which Mr. VAN BUREN zealously supported the claim, the bill was ordered to a third reading.
Mr. VAN BUREN, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported a bill to authorize the issuing of letters patent to Adolphus G. Trott; which was read, and ordered to be passed to a second reading.
Mr Winne has written me on the subject of a consulship in S. America & having lost his address I am under the necessity of troubling you with the answer. Mr Adams called upon me this morng & told me that for most of the commercial places in that region Consuls had already been appointed,... Continue Reading
Too faint to read on microfilm.
Mr. VAN BUREN, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported a bill allowing fees to the District Attorney of Missouri; which was read.
The Senate proceeded to consider, as in committee of the whole, the bill allowing fees to the District Attorney of Missouri, when, after some debate, in which Messrs. VAN BUREN, BARTON, EATON, and BENTON, took part, the bill was, on motion of Mr. Eaton, ordered to lie on the table.
Mr. VAN BUREN, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill abolishing imprisonment for debt, reported the same.
Foreseeing that it would not be practicable for me to attend to the argument of the Eden cause here, I gave Mr Griswold notice thereof, & advised him to see that Webster was secured. I am happy to find that that has been done. All the assistance I can give him, by way of conference, it will be... Continue Reading
Mr. VAN BUREN, from the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom the resolution was referred, authorizing the purchase of a certain number of copies of the Journals of Congress, from 1774 to 1788, reported it without amendment.

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