William Lyon Mackenzie, The Life and Times of Martin Van Buren . . . (1846)

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I bought a deerskin vest, at the store on the corner of Broadway and Liberty street. Will you do my friend Mr. Rowan, Senator from Kentucky, the favour of purchasing one for him, and sending it down by the first opportunity? It must be the largest in the shop, as he is a prodigious fellow. If you can, oblige him—write him a civil letter—he is a very worthy fellow.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
This will be handed to you by Mr. Davis, agent of the editor of the National Telegraph, who visits our State to obtain subscribers here for that paper. Any assistance you can give him in promoting his object will be gratefully remembered by the editor, and oblige
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
Being entirely free from ENDORSEMENTS now, and my situation rendering it highly proper that I should remain so, I did not suppose I could have been again drawn into them. YQUR CASE, HOWEVER, DOES NOT ADMIT OF HESITATION. Wishing you all sorts of happiness,
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
This will be handed to you by Master Hayne, son of my friend Colonel Hayne of South Carolina. He wishes to come on to this place under the protection of some person travelling southward. Do me the favor to see that the wishes of his father, in that particular, are attended to. My friend Thomas Ludlow is coming on.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
When I left Washington, it was my intention to have been back by this time: but the extreme hospitality of the Southrons, has rendered it absolutely impossible. We shall leave here on Wednesday morning, and after stopping a few days at Raleigh, ———, and Richmond, make the best of our way home. I have looked anxiously into the marriage and deaths for your name, but have not yet seen it in either.... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
Will you do me the favor to get Dennis or some one else to clean up my harness and Phaeton, and send them to me by one of the boats, with directions to give me the earliest information of its arrival. I want to exchange it here. I cannot pay the postage of this but will repay it among your other expenses. Excuse me for troubling you, and write me
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Lorenzo Hoyt
I have sent a copy of the enclosed to Mr. Wilcoxon, with directions to advertise anew. The Chancellor would not grant the order B. sent by Mr. Butler. Consult Mr. B. as to the form of making the amendment, and do it for me forthwith. I have no opportunity of paying the postage of this but you will, of course, keep an account of your expences in this matter.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Lorenzo Hoyt
I must leave here on Saturday morning, and if my carriage cannot be sent down so that I can have it by Friday morning, it will not be worth while to send it.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Lorenzo Hoyt
I am detained here by nothing save the carriage; and, contrary to my letter of yesterday, I wish you would send it down upon the receipt of this, if I should have to wait until next Monday to exchange it.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Lorenzo Hoyt
Our friends abroad may calculate with absolute certainty on at least three-fourths of the votes of this state. There is no doubt of it. Nothing short of the death of our candidate can, I think, prevent it. If Barry [W.T.] succeeds in your state, the administration will find it extremely difficult to keep their troops in the field in this.
Sender/Author: MVB
I have received yours at this place, and thank you for it. You may assure your friends in Kentucky, that the vote of this state will be stronger for General Jackson than his most sanguine friends anticipated. Of three-fourths there is not the slightest doubt. I care not who you show this letter to, but keep me out of the newspapers.
Sender/Author: MVB
I thank you sincerely for your several communications. They have been a source of both pain and pleasure to me—the latter on account of their contents, and the former on account of the extreme difficulty I have had to make out what their contents were. You would certainly correct this, if you knew how extremely painful it is to your friends. I would have written to you before, but have had no... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
You need not, I think, have any apprehension about the message. The earliest allowable moment will be embraced to send you a copy; but that cannot be as soon as you desire. I thank you kindly for your letter, and beg you to write me always with equal freedom. I cannot consent to contribute by any act of mine to the prevalence of that great political vice, a desire to shun responsibility. I shall... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
Do me a favor to find out the residence of Mr. Forman, and give the enclosed to him. You may ascertain it from Mr. Newbold, or Catlin, or Chancellor Kent.
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
I return your Mr. B.’s letter. I have never doubted his personal friendship for me. I would always have been happy to do him good, but I cannot directly or indirectly afford pecuniary aid to his press, and more particularly so as I am situated at the present moment. If he cannot continue friendly to me on public grounds and with perfect independence, I can only regret it, but I desire no other... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
General Vance, with whose good character and respectability you are well acquainted, goes to New York on business in which our State is deeply interested, and in respect to which you may perhaps be of service to him. If you can do so, I hope you will–and am very cordially yours,
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
This will be handed you by my friend Joseph Kernochan, Esquire, one of the delegates from the merchants of this City, charged with a memorial to Congress in relation to the embarrassed condition of our Commercial affairs. He has now retired, but has recently been extensively engaged in business, and his great experience enables him to know all the variety of forms of Mercantile operations, and... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Jesse Hoyt
Recipient: MVB
My friend and neighbor, Elbert J. Anderson, Esquire, who will deliver you this, visits Washington as one of a Committee of Merchants, charged with a memorial from a portion of that class of our citizens, in relation to the present embarrassed state of trade. He is extensively and actively engaged in business, and is familiarly acquainted with the difficulties that seem, and no doubt actually do... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: Jesse Hoyt
Recipient: MVB
There is certainly nothing that I could do for you with propriety and effect that I would omit. I cannot, however, write to Mr. Swartwout. On this subject, I have done so so often without success, that self-respect has compelled me to desist. I presume, however, that he has his hands full. If the expression of my wishes in behalf of your son can be of use, he may show this letter to the Collector... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
The attack on the Vice President has produced very great excitement. The course pursued will cause it to recoil with severity. There is of course not the slightest presence for the allegation. Mr. Satterlee Clark of your city is the “gentleman from New York.” My friend Judge Rowan is 45 inches round the chest. My quondam friend John A. King, whilst here, stayed with Mr. Webster; and when he... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt
I am distressed by Lorenzo's accounts of your affairs in New York. When will the Republican Party be made sensible of the indispensable necessity of nominating none but true and tried men, so that when they succeed they gain something? The same game that is playing with you was in a degree played here on the nomination of Attorney General. The only personal objection that was made to Mr. Butler,... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
It is impossible to judge correctly without a view of the whole ground. Some two or three weeks before the meeting of the Legislature, Sudam by letter requested my neutrality. I shewed it to Mr. Butler, and, with his approbation, replied, that I would consider it my duty, under all circumstances, not to interfere. Bronson's friends had the address to push Dudley into the Senate, and MARCY WAS SO... Continue Reading
Sender/Author: MVB
Recipient: Jesse Hoyt