Register of Debates

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Mr. RUGGLES and Mr. VAN BUREN advocated the justice and equity of the claim. It had twice passed the House, but had not got through both Houses for want of time. The claim was originally for 7,000 dollars, but had been reduced to the sum now proposed, of $3,110, to which the petitioners were fairly entitled, in the opinion of the committee that reported the bill, &c. The debate continued some... Continue Reading
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The Senate having resumed the consideration of the bill “to abolish imprisonment for debt,” The first part of the first section of the bill being as follows:-“That no bail or security for the appearance of any defendant or defendants shall hereafter be required upon the service of the original, or mesne process, issuing out of the Courts of the United States, in any action or suit whatever,... Continue Reading
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The debate had continued between two and three hours, when Mr. Talbot had concluded; and Mr. VAN BUREN, (chairman of the committee who made the report,) expressing a desire to submit his views in its support, asked to be indulged until to-morrow, as the hour was now late, and moved to lay the report on the table; which was agreed to.
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Mr. VAN BUREN thought that the government was called upon to afford the same protection to these people, who were engaged in a foreign trade, that was extended to those of the other parts of the Union. The only questions were, whether this trade existed, and whether it was a trade according to the laws and Constitution. If so, they have a right to call on the government for protection; provided,... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN said that the subject under consideration was justly considered by the gentlemen who had spoken before him, as one of the utmost importance, requiring prompt, zealous, and efficient attention of the government. It was one in which a great portion of his immediate constituents, from their situation and pursuits, had a deep interest, and thinking so, partook largely of the general... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN moved to recommit the bill to the Committee on Foreign Relations, with the following instructions: “Resolved, That the bill “For the suppression of Piracy in the West Indies,” be recommitted to the Committee on Foreign Relations, with instructions to report amendments thereto, giving power to the President, on its being satisfactorily proved to him that any of the pirates mentioned... Continue Reading
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The Senate again took up the bill “for the Suppression of Piracy.” The following motion, made yesterday, by Mr. VAN BUREN, being still pending, viz: Resolved, That the bill “For the suppression of Piracy in the West Indies,” be recommitted to the Committee on Foreign Relations, with instructions to report amendments thereto, giving power to the President, on its being satisfactorily proved to him... Continue Reading
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The Senate resumed consideration of the bill to suppress Piracy in the West Indies—the amendment proposed by Mr. SMITH (granting aid to merchantmen to arm) being still pending. On this amendment, and various propositions to modify it, in regard to the kind and quantity of armament required, the amount of premium, &c. a discussion took place, which continued about two hours. In this discussion... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN then renewed the motion he had unsuccessfully made in committee of the whole, to recommit the bill to a select committee, with instructions “to report amendments thereto, giving power to the President, on its being satisfactorily proved to him that any of the pirates, mentioned in the said act, find refuge in any of the cities or ports of the said Island of Cuba, or other Islands... Continue Reading
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The Senate resumed the consideration of the report of the Committee on the Judiciary, unfavorable to the petition of Ebenezer Oliver and others, together with the motion to strike out of the resolution accompanying, the word “not,” so as to reverse the report. The debate on this subject was resumed, and continued during the whole of this day’s sitting. Mr. VAN BUREN spoke at great length against... Continue Reading
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Mr. EATON then moved to add the following as an amendment: “If any objection shall arise to the vote or votes of any state, it shall be filed in writing and entered on the Journals of the Senate and House of Representatives; but the two Houses shall not separate until the entire votes are counted and reported, which report shall be liable to be controlled and altered by the decision to be made by... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN agreed that something ought to be done, and they must adopt one of two courses; either the present system, as a system, should be retained, and be extended to these states, by appointing additional judges; or, that the system should be changed. He urged the necessity of carefully considering the subject, in all its bearings, before coming to a decision; for, on this decision would... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN, of New York, said, that the question immediately before the Senate, was a motion to postpone indefinitely, made on the single ground of want of time to do justice to so important a subject. The wide range of debate which this question had produced, would be more properly considered when the previous question was disposed of. The motion had been divided—it was, in the first instance... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN offered a few remarks; he expressed his unwillingness to go into the discussion at so late a period of the session, but he did not see how it could be avoided. He therefore felt himself under some sense of obligation and duty to proceed to the examination and discussion of the subject, unless the motion to recommit should to-day be successful.
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Mr. VAN BUREN thought it apparent, from the votes of to-day, that the Senate was not only determined on acting on this subject, but was decidedly in favor of the principle contained in the Bill; that is, the appointment of additional circuit judges, who should be also Judges of the Supreme Court. For himself, he preferred the plan that had been offered by Mr. BARBOUR; the separation of the... Continue Reading
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The Senate took up, as in committee of the whole, the bill to provide for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States, and for other purposes. A considerable time was spent in the discussion of the details of this bill, which was participated in by Messrs. HAYNE, HOLMES, of Maine, COBB, CHANDLER, DICKERSON, VAN BUREN, BROWN, JOHNSON, of Ken. and TALBOT.
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Mr. VAN BUREN was too sensible of the indulgence he had received from the Senate yesterday, to trespass longer on their time than would be required to notice one or two of the points touched on by the gentleman from South Carolina. That gentleman had done no more than justice to the enormities practised on our fellow citizens; the documents on our tables were replete with evidence of the most... Continue Reading
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Mr. LOWRIE moved then to strike out the 1st section of the bill, which repealed the 15th section of the original act. A long debate ensued, in which Messrs. LOWRIE, EATON, BENTON, SMITH, BARTON, KELLY, HOLMES, of Maine, and VAN BUREN, took part, and it was finally decided in the negative by yeas and nays, as follows:
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Mr. VAN BUREN then said, that this was a subject on which great diversity of opinion had existed, as was manifested both at the last session, and at the present, by the number of propositions that had been offered. It was from this consideration that he thought a larger number should compose the Committee to whom the subject was now to be referred, than was usual, and, therefore, he should move... Continue Reading
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Mr. VAN BUREN submitted the following motion for consideration: “Resolved, That Congress does not possess the power to make Roads and Canals within the respective States. “Resolved, That a select committee be appointed, with instructions to prepare and report a Joint Resolution, for an amendment of the Constitution, prescribing and defining the power Congress shall have over the subject of... Continue Reading
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Various other amendments, of inferior importance, were offered to the details of the bill, some of which succeeded, and others were lost—in the proposition or discussion of which Messrs. COBB, MILLS, VAN BUREN, BROWN of Ohio, and JOHNSON of Ky. took part.
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