James Madison Papers (DLC)

"The Madison Papers consist of approximately 12,000 items, spanning the period 1723-1859, captured in some 72,000 digital images. They document the life of the man who came to be known as the “Father of the Constitution” through correspondence, personal notes, drafts of letters and legislation, an autobiography, legal and financial documents, and his notes on the 1787 federal Constitutional Convention. The papers cover Madison’s years as a college student; as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, Continental Congress, and Confederation Congress; as a delegate to the 1787 federal Constitutional Convention and the Virginia ratification convention of 1788; his terms in the House of Representatives, as secretary of state, and as president of the United States. Also documented are his retirement and the settlement of his estate; matters relating to his family, including his wife, Dolley Payne Madison; and his home, Montpelier, in Virginia." https://www.loc.gov/collections/james-madison-papers/about-this-collection/

Documents in this Collection:

J. M. had occasion lately to return his thanks to Mr. Van Buren for a copy of the Executive proceedings, of the Senate relating to the Mission to the Cong. at Panama. He now ^has now to^ addr those <illegible> due for the Copy since rec of the very able Speech deliverd by Mr [. . .] on that subject repeating at the same time assurances of his high & friendly respects.
Recipient: MVB
I appreciate most highly the favourable opinion you have been pleased to express of my remarks on the Panama Mission. A great change in public opinion has taken place and is still progressing on that subject. The discussions in the Senate were commenced under a general belief that the measure was a popular one. That belief was founded on the knowledge of the favourable reception by the people of... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
At the two last sessions I submitted to the Senate resolutions proposing an amendment to the Constitution relative to the power of Congress over the subject of internal improvements. They were not acted upon through the belief that existing circumstance were unfavourable. It is my intention to attempt something upon the subject at the commencement of the next, & I take the liberty of saying... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
As the accompanying report may not have come to your hands ^reached you^ I take the liberty of sending it to you. You will ^observe^ not fail to notice the lame attempt to make out that Genl. Washington was in favour of the power <illegible> on the contrary ^The result of his <illegible> must be <illegible> result <illegible>^ the <illegible> <illegible> ^... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
I am not certain whether I did what I intended to do last Fall. That is making my sincere acknowledgements to you for your kindness in relation to my request. I have thought it advisable to leave the matter until the next session, at the commencement of which I shall enter in earnest upon the subject. If in the meantime you can conveniently say any thing to me that will be of service you will... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
I am quite certain that ^it^ needs not my assurance ^to satisfy you^ that my seeming inattention to your letter has arisen from unavoidable causes. The truth is I been upon the go all summer & I hope not unprofitably employed. Let me put your mind at rest upon the subject of the election. Our State will give Jackson between 25 & 32 votes as certainly as the election comes. Consider them... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
As the accompanying report may not have reached you I take the liberty of transmitting it. You will observe the lame attempt of the committee to make out that Genl. Washington was in favour of the power. The result of their labours must be a contrary impression; for however difficult it may be to discriminate between this question and that of the Bank originally, still the deep interest he... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: James Madison
J.M. with his respects to M.V.B. returns ^thanks^ him for the copy of his speech in behalf of the Surviving officers of the Revolutionary Army. They are very fortunate in having such able advocates It is a painful reflection, that after all that can now be done, so much of the price of Independence, should be left for the pages of History as a charge ^<illegible>^ agst. the justice &... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB