DLC, Library of Congress

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Under the belief that it is the right of every free Citizen in a free government, to know the opinions of those who aspire to public Station, upon great public questions, as one of your warmest supporters in 1836 & in 1840, & as an unpledged Delegate to the Baltimore Convention, I desire particularly to know your opinions as to the Constitutionality & expediency of immediately... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I Received a Letter from you some days sinc[e] upon the subject of the <ensuing> election, but have been pr[e]vented by absence from home from answering it soone[r]. The Sentiments of liberality and magnan[i]mity which it contains are such as from a knowledge of your Character and the quallities of your h[e]art I had a right ^to^ and did expect. Possessed of strong personal prejudices for... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
I have forwarded to the author of the enclosed, a letter addressed to yourself, (as he requests) in behalf of the object he solicits. After dispatching my letter, it occurred to me that I had better present to you his own communication which is a faithful type of its author, clear, strong, direct. He is indeed a most estimable man; and for further knowledge of him if desired, I will refer you to... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Now, as heretofore, I will not suffer the warm current of my friendship for you to be checked by the character & kind of your associate#. If I can be of any service in the affair you allude to It will give me pleasure to be so; though <I thusly> necessarily serve the bitterest enemy I, probably, have in the world. The course is a petition to congress, setting forth the case with... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Your good husband occasionally (when asked) says that you make enquires about & kind friendly messages to us; but they are <unclear word> so <unclear word>, & so long between, that I am inclined to think that you have forgotten us poor congressmen. So far as the lower house is concerned, you are right, for it is getting to resemble a bear garden more than a deliberative... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Make use of the information of contained in this letter if useful (to yourself it will be a guide) but do not mention names. Varplanck yesterday in presence of my wife said Well Adams is a Clintonian I have received a letter from Washington informing me that Adams was in favor of Spencer. That In this state the Contest was between Mr Clinton & Mr Van Buren & his friends from the latter he... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
Your letter found me in my bed, from which, I assure you, I have risen with some difficulty. My exposure in the trial of a canal cause, in the lower part of the county, brought on a violent cold, accompanied with chills & fevers, and for the first time in six years, I had a violent bilious attack. I have happily survived it however, and hope now to live to fight an other day. We all regretted... Continue Reading
Sender: Louis McLane
Recipient: MVB
I have not been able sooner to make the communication, nor is the measure absolutely <unclear word>, that the mission to G. Britain has been offered to me, and that it is probable I may accept it. At present I mention the same to you without wishing to be quoted
Sender: Rufus King
Recipient: MVB
I [rec]d. your letter at the moment of my departure for the Country where I have since been confined by indisposition from which I am ^have^ however entirely recovered. I had been previously advised of the offer of the mission to you though from a satisfactory <unclear word> though not an official source & am happy to hear that ^you have found^ no obstacle objection to its acceptance.... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Rufus King
I will be ready to go to Oswego on Saturday. You and Finkle therefore better come up on Saturday morning & we will start from here in the afternoon & go as far as Schenectady in the evening. Write me by mail when I may expect you & I will be ready. If any other day will suit better fix upon it but not longer than Monday.
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Peter I. Hoes
Let me by this <unclear word> introduce to you my friend President Cooper of Cola. College. S.C. His name is enough. He has requested of me this favor on board the boat, and I have no implements of writing but these.
Recipient: MVB
My friend Judge W. Smith to whom Col. Hayne succeeded in the Senate at Washington from South Carolina, & Dr. Brown of Kentucky, left New York yesterday, and promised to wait for me at Albany. I have sent to every house but Crittenden’s, without learning of them. As I know Judge Smith meant to call on you, I beg you wd. have the kindness to inform my Son the bearer of this, whether you know of... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I enclose you two papers, one respecting the interference of the Clergy with the duties of the legislature, which I mentd. to you, & the other, to paralyse the report of Mr Jefferson being a Tariff-politician & in favour of protecting duties. In theory, and in justice, all duties for protection, are in my mind utterly indefensible: for they are taxes on the consumers without any <... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I have concluded to make no arrangement on the Subject of Quarters until I arrive in Washington. I have had conversations with Forsyth & McLane on the Subject & must see them before I determine. Those two Gentlemen, (or the former only if the latter takes his wife down) VerPlank yourself & myself would make an excellent mess. Write to the <Frenchman>. Take care of the Election... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Enclosed you will find a letter addressed to yourself about my brother William, for whom I am anxious to obtain orders for Entering into the service. It is such a letter as I supposed you might with propriety transmit (as you suggested) to the Secretary of the Navy. I regret that I was out of town when you called at my house, but was pleased to learn that there would be no difficulty about my... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I shall attend to your brothers concern. Mr. J. forgets what is due to the subject, to his friends & to myself. I can conscientiously say that I never have, and I <unclear word> I never shall subject my course on a public question to the controul of my personal interests. I shall always listen with respect and <candor> to Any suggestion which may be made <to me> on the... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB
Recipient: Edward Livingston
I have to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from you. The period has not yet arrived here for interesting political events but is rapidly approaching. Genl Root has made <us> a visit to the <unclear word> and does not appear to have any <unclear word> to be <gratified>, I mean political <unclear word>. He is in favour of Young for speaker & Livingston for Clerk... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I have heard with the most lively satisfaction the of the course taken by you in the Senate in relation to the nomination of my friend Conkling. It was <unclear word> it was kind & magnanimous. I have advised Conkling of it. Your generous conduct is entitled to the warmest gratification of him and his Friends. It will I trust be remembered and duly appreciated by them, but ^by them^ now... Continue Reading
Recipient: MVB
I wish you & your family not forgetting my <dearest> heart Miss Margaret a very merry Christmass. <unclear word> the day is dark & raining & except the promise of some pleasure at dinner with Mr & Mrs. McLane <unclear word> & every thing <else> appears to be out of sorts. Nothing has transpired of much interest in the political world. The Jackson men... Continue Reading
Sender: MVB